Articles on COVID-19

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Despite assurances of a sufficient and stable supply, citizens start to hoard toilet paper and other food items. www.shutterstock.com

COVID-19: how to deal with our cognitive biases

Cognitive biases often lead us to irrational behaviours such as hoarding toilet paper.
Women internalized their role as caregivers so much so that, more often than not, the question of “whose work is getting priority in your couple?” is never even asked. Shutterstock

As lockdown ends, women executives are also at the end of their rope

Caught between the educational care of children and a considerable amount of full-time work to be done, women managers continue to shoulder a large part of the domestic and parental burden.
SARS-CoV-2 turns on a cellular switch to build the tubes in this photo – called filopodia – that might help viral particles – the little spheres – spread more easily. Dr Elizabeth Fischer, NIAID NIH / Bouhaddou et al. Elsevier 2020

Coronavirus and cancer hijack the same parts in human cells to spread – and our team identified existing cancer drugs that could fight COVID-19

Kinases are cellular control switches. When they malfunction, they can cause cancer. The coronavirus hijacks these kinases to replicate, and cancer drugs that target them could fight COVID-19.
A member of the nursing staff at Chandaria Health Centre in Nairobi, Kenya, measures the temperatures of visiting patients. Tony Karumba/AFP via Getty Images

Why managing blood pressure matters during COVID-19 pandemic

Most facilities prioritize COVID-19 cases. In addition, curfews are still in effect in Kenya, which affects the working hours of clinics providing hypertension care services.
With tourism revenue drying up due to COVID-19, the debate surrounding trophy hunting of wildlife species like African lions is more relevant now than before. Alex Braczkowski

COVID-19, Africa’s conservation and trophy hunting dilemma

A new study evaluates what South African landowners who run trophy hunting operations would do in the event of a hunting ban.
Streaming services are carrying more foreign-language content. While people are stuck at home because of the pandemic, why not use the time to improve their language skills? (Shutterstock)

Watching foreign-language TV during the coronavirus pandemic can help you learn a new language

While staying at home during the pandemic, foreign language learners can improve their vocabulary and comprehension by watching films and television shows in the language they are studying.

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