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Articles on COVID-19 vaccine

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A lab technician holds a vial of a COVID-19 vaccine candidate during testing at the Chula Vaccine Research Center, run by Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand on May 25, 2020. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Explainer: How clinical trials test COVID-19 vaccines

Will a vaccine for COVID-19 be safe? Animal testing, human clinical trials and post-approval surveillance give us good grounds to believe that a future approved vaccine will work and be safe.
FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn, right, and President Trump at a Coronavirus Task Force meeting March 19, 2020. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

FDA is departing from long-standing procedures to deal with public health crises, and this may foreshadow problems for COVID-19 vaccines

The rushed emergency approval for a treatment that might help COVID-19 patients has raised questions: Is the FDA abandoning its own guidelines?
On Aug. 11, Russian President Vladimir Putin announced that a coronavirus vaccine developed in the country has been registered for use. Russian Health Ministry/Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

A COVID-19 vaccine needs the public’s trust – and it’s risky to cut corners on clinical trials, as Russia is

As Russia fast tracks a coronavirus vaccine, scientists worry about skipped safety checks – and the potential fallout for trust in vaccines if something ends up going wrong.
A new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, discloses the results from phase 1 of Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine trials. YurolaitsAlbert / Getty Images

Video: An infectious disease expert explains the results from Moderna’s latest vaccine trials

The results from the phase 1 trial are a promising first step in showing that the mRNA vaccine is a viable candidate, but there are unanswered questions and it is still early in the process.
Indian health workers doing health checks in Mumbai, June 17, 2020. AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool, File

Ending the pandemic will take global access to COVID-19 treatment and vaccines – which means putting ethics before profits

The high cost of pharmaceuticals often means only the richest patients get lifesaving medicines. As coronavirus drugs emerge, it will require hard, creative work to ensure they're available to all.

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