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Articles on Dinosaurs

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Fossils of Shuvuuia deserti depict a small predatory creature with exceptional night vision and hearing. Mick Ellison/American Natural History Museum

Nocturnal dinosaurs: Night vision and superb hearing in a small theropod suggest it was a moonlight predator

By looking at the eye bones and ear canals of extinct dinosaurs, researchers show that a small ancient predator likely hunted at night and had senses as good as a modern barn owl.
Tyrannosaurus rex spanned all of ancient North America, and about 20,000 lived at once. Roger Harris/Science Photo Library vie Getty Images

How many Tyrannosaurus rex walked the Earth?

Using the incredible wealth of fossil data and a modern ecological theory, researchers estimated population density for the extinct apex predator.
A live reconstruction of Anteosaurus attacking a herbivorous Moschognathus. Artwork by Alex Bernardini @SimplexPaléo

New study reveals the secrets of an ancient, extinct super predator

Because of its skeleton’s heavy architecture, scientists have always assumed that Anteosaurus was a rather sluggish, slow-moving animal, only capable of scavenging or ambushing its prey, at best.
The radiodont Anomalocaris, with its large stalked eyes, is considered a top predator that swam in the oceans more than 500 million years ago. Katrina Kenny

Freaky ‘frankenprawns’: ancient deep sea monsters called radiodonts had incredible vision that likely drove an evolutionary arms race

Our study on weird ancient marine animals called radiodonts supports the idea that vision played a crucial role during the Cambrian Explosion, a rapid burst of evolution about 500 million years ago.
Microbial mats in Shark Bay, Western Australia, similar to those that lived around 200 million years ago. Yalimay Jimenez Duarte WA-OIGC, Curtin University

How chemical clues from prehistoric microbes rewrote the story of one of Earth’s biggest mass extinctions

The end-Triassic mass extinction was a cataclysm for the world’s prehistoric species, killed off by volcanoes that altered Earth’s seas and skies. But new research shows it didn’t happen when we thought.

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