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Articles on Impeachment

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The U.S. Capitol, which was besieged by insurrectionists on Jan. 6, and where the Trump impeachment trial takes place in the Senate. Xinhua/Liu Jie via Getty Images

Impeachment trial: Research spanning decades shows language can incite violence

Language affects behavior. When words champion aggression, make violence acceptable and embolden audiences to action, incidents like the insurrection at the Capitol are the result.
House of Representatives members and staff walk the article of impeachment against Donald Trump across the Capitol. AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Impeaching a former president – 4 essential reads

There are a lot of questions about the point of putting on trial someone who is no longer in office.
A video screen displays Donald Trump’s face as he prepares to address a crowd of his supporters. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

At impeachment hearing, lawmakers will deliberate over a deadly weapon used in the attack on Capitol Hill – President Trump’s words

Words have consequences. And decades of research supports the contention that Donald Trump’s words could in fact incite people to mount an insurrection at the US Capitol.
President Donald Trump gestures during a Jan. 6 speech in Washington, D.C. AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Federal leaders have two options if they want to rein in Trump

Calls have emerged from many sources for Congress or the Cabinet to remove Trump from office in the wake of the U.S. Capitol incursion Jan. 6. Who could act, and what could they do?
Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase presided over the Senate during President Andrew Johnson’s impeachment trial. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper/Wikimedia Commons

The Senate has actually tied in an impeachment trial – twice

In 1868, during the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, the Senate tied on two votes. Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase broke both ties.

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