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Articles on Russian revolution

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Smoke rises on April 15, 2022, above 400 new graves in the town of Severodonetsk, Ukraine. Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Russia is being made a pariah state – just like it and the Soviet Union were for most of the last 105 years

The West’s new approach to Russia – bar it from international organizations, restrict international trade, prevent further military moves – looks just like how it treated Russia in the 20th century.
Memorial tanks at the Ukrainian Motherland Monument in Kyiv. Madeleine Kelly/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Why did Russia invade Ukraine?

Who are the Ukrainians and when were they part of the same empire as Russia? A scholar answers basic questions on war in Ukraine.
Hong Kong protesters shelter behind a thin barrier – and umbrellas – as police fire tear gas and encircle a group of demonstrators. AP Photo/Vincent Yu

Is there hope for a Hong Kong revolution?

Revolutions are built not on deep misery but on rising expectations. History may not provide much hope of immediate change in Hong Kong – but protesters may have a longer view.
Tarana Burke created #MeToo in 2006 but it didn’t emerge as a mass social movement until 2017. AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes

Why social movements like #MeToo seem to come out of nowhere

From the French Revolution to #MeToo, social movements often burst into the mainstream with what seems like little warning. Cass Sunstein explains why.
To try and understand the Russian revolution outside of the broader social context of the time is to neglect the development of nationhood in the region. Wikicommons

World politics explainer: the Russian revolution

The Russian Revolution – an event that affected more than Russia and was more than a revolution.
Across the world, allegations of sexual assault have hinged on women’s credibility. Michael Reynolds/Pool Photo via AP

Kavanaugh sexual assault hearing evokes early Soviet mock trials

A century ago, Russian leaders staged mock trials on rape and abortion to educate citizens about new Soviet laws and values. Then, as now, victim-blaming and ‘he said, she said’ marred the verdict.
On the streets of Petrograd on July 4, 1917, when troops of the provisional government opened fire on demonstrators. Viktor Bulla/Wikimedia Commons

Conquered city, site of revolutions from above and below

The physical and political space of cities can be shaped from above or below, but few have had more revolutionary changes, first under the tsars, then the communists, than St Petersburg.
Vladimir Lenin and Nadezhda Krupskaya. Antoon Kuper/flickr

Nadya Krupskaya: the Russian revolutionary

Russian revolutionary Nadezhda Krupskaya, like other leading women in the new Stalin-led state, was marginalised. But in her case, because she was Lenin’s widow.
Female protesters in Petrograd (now St Petersburg) in 1917 on International Women’s Day. Wikimedia Commons

One American woman’s life in revolutionary Russia

How a journalist from Nebraska chased the ‘Soviet dream’ all the way to Russia, only to be expelled on accusations of espionage.

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