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Articles on Aerosols

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Low-cost air-ventilation systems have been installed in many classrooms across the U.S. to help reduce COVID-19 transmission. Halfpoint Images/Moment via Getty Images

COVID-19 has spurred investments in air filtration for K-12 schools – but these technologies aren’t an instant fix

Air-ventilation upgrades have been badly needed in U.S. classrooms since long before the pandemic. Low-tech filtration systems that cost about the same as a textbook per student can make a big difference.
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We studied how to reduce airborne COVID spread in hospitals. Here’s what we learnt

We found two small air cleaners in a single hospital room could clear 99% of potentially infectious COVID aerosols within 5.5 minutes.
Masks work only if they fit well, and wearing two can ensure a tight fit. Eduardo Maquilón/Getty Images/Stringer via Getty Images News

CDC says masks must fit tightly – and two are better than one

How well your mask works depends on how well it fits. Wearing two snug masks made of different materials offers 95% protection from exposure to aerosols that could contain the coronavirus.
The new SARS-CoV-2 variant’s increased transmissibility is believed to come from a change in the spike protein, visible here in yellow under an electron microscope. National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases

How to stay safe with a fast-spreading new coronavirus variant on the loose

The new SARS-CoV-2 variant is already spreading in the US and could be dominant by March, the CDC warns. Here’s what that means for the masks you choose and how you practice social distancing.
Although cloth masks have been widely adopted, many people still have questions about them. (Usplash/Vera Davidova)

COVID-19 masks FAQs: How can cloth stop a tiny virus? What’s the best fabric? Do they protect the wearer?

Epidemiologists reviewed 25 studies of cloth face masks. Here’s what they found out about how well they work, why they work, who they protect and why the mosquito and chain-link fence analogy is wrong.
Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, hugging another guest, along with Kellyanne Conway (left) and Notre Dame University President Rev. John Jenkins (right) tested positive for COVID-19. The Washington Post via Getty Images

Being outdoors doesn’t mean you’re safe from COVID-19 – a White House event showed what not to do

The outdoors is less risky than an enclosed room, but it isn’t a COVID-19-free zone. Here’s what you need to know.

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