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Articles on African science

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An illustration shows how, about 65 million years ago, a large asteroid collided with Earth. It hit what is today Mexico and created the Chicxulub crater. Mark Garlick/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Curious Kids: Why are there so few impact craters on Earth?

Impact craters are relatively shallow, so these bowl-shaped “dents” in Earth’s rocky crust can be easily buried or erased by erosion.
W.E.B. Du Bois in his office at The Crisis in New York City, 1925. W. E. B. Du Bois Papers (MS 312). Special Collections and University Archives, University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries

W.E.B. Du Bois embraced science to fight racism as editor of NAACP’s magazine The Crisis

As editor of the magazine for 24 years, Du Bois featured articles about biology, evolution, archaeology in Africa and more to refute the rampant scientific racism of the early 20th century.
Scientists around Africa are working at the cutting edge of research and their work is relevant beyond the continent. PIUS UTOMI EKPEI/AFP via Getty Images

Quality research in Africa matters more than ever – for the whole world

Thanks to major science infrastructure, human resource training and education investment in African nations, the continent is well placed to lead from the front.
Africa is data-rich and well connected. Therein lies the solution to many of its challenges. S.Gvozd/Shutterstock

How data science in and for Africa can blaze new trails

Data science, led by Africa-based scientists, could play a key role in addressing all of the continent’s crucial needs.
Young African scientists face persistent barriers which cause them to leave academia. Shutterstock/WAYHOME studio

What’s stopping young African scientists from achieving their potential

The Global State of Young Scientists Africa project investigates the challenges that shape the career trajectories of young African scientists.
Africa has the chance to innovate and grow, with the right policies and investment. Shutterstock

Calestous Juma: how Africa can honour his legacy

Calestous Juma believed that Africa needed an integrated science, technology and innovation framework. The continent can make this happen.
The demand for “decolonised education” may jeopardise research and learning in South Africa. Nic Bothma/EPA

What “decolonised education” should and shouldn’t mean

It’s important that South African teachers, lecturers and professors develop curricula that build on the best knowledge skills, values, beliefs and habits from around the world.

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