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Articles on Alaska Natives

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Community groups, like this one in Phoenix, have been working to get people of color to contribute their information to the census. AP Photo/Terry Tang

Shortened census count will hurt communities of color

The census will likely count fewer Black Americans, Indigenous peoples, Asian Americans and Americans of Hispanic or Latino origin than there actually are.
Johnnie Henry, president of the Navajo Nation’s Church Rock chapter house community center, hauls drinking water to neighbors in Gallup, N.M., May 7, 2020. AP Photo/Morgan Lee

Native American tribes’ pandemic response is hamstrung by many inequities

Many Native American tribes are reporting high COVID-19 infection rates. State and federal agencies are impeding tribes' efforts to handle the pandemic themselves.
Leaders of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska voted to postpone the 85th Annual Tribal Assembly because of the pandemic. Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska

Tribal leaders face great need and don’t have enough resources to respond to the coronavirus pandemic

American Indians and Alaska Natives are the most impoverished and marginalized group in the US. Tribes are working to protect their people from the coronavirus, but they have few resources to do so.
Alaska Native girls prepare to dance in honor of the beginning of the 2020 Census in rural Alaska. The Census count begins in this state out of necessity and tradition. AP Images/Gregory Bull

Indian Country leaders urge Native people to be counted in 2020 Census

Native Americans who live in villages and on traditional lands have been undercounted by the U.S. Census for decades.
2016’s warm winter meant not enough snow for the start of the Iditarod sled dog race in Anchorage, so it was brought by train from 360 miles north. AP/Rachel D'Oro

In Alaska, everyone’s grappling with climate change

For everyone from traditional hunters to the military, the National Park Service to the oil industry, climate change is the new reality in Alaska. Government, residents and businesses are all trying to adapt.

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