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Articles on Antimicrobial

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While ivermectin was originally used to treat river blindness, it has also been repurposed to treat other human parasitic infections. ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP via Getty Images

Ivermectin is a Nobel Prize-winning wonder drug – but not for COVID-19

Ivermectin has been a lifesaving drug for people with parasitic infections like river blindness and strongyloidiasis. But taking it for COVID-19 may result in the opposite effect.
According to the World Health Organisation, antimicrobial resistance is now at crisis point. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Recent death from resistant bug won’t be the last

The US Centers for Disease Control has reported a woman in her 70s has died of overwhelming sepsis caused by a bacterium that was resistant to all available antibiotics.
It’s bacterial biofilms that give the Grand Prismatic Spring its colorful hues. Karin Sauer

Unlocking the secrets of bacterial biofilms – to use against them

The vast majority of the bacteria that surround us are not free-floating but prefer to band together in cooperative communities called biofilms. How do biofilms form and cooperate?
A pharmacist dispensing drugs at Nairobi’s Mater Hospital. Resistance to antibiotics is high in Africa. Reuters/Thomas Mukoya

Africa has a long way to go to close the gap on antibiotic resistance

Antibiotics are used extensively in Africa because of the continent’s high disease burden. This also means that resistance is high. Steps are being taken to raise awareness and encourage prudent use.
Staph aureus bloodstream infection has a 12-month death rate of between 20 and 35%. Joe Techapanupreeda/Shutterstock

Golden staph: the deadly bug that wreaks havoc in hospitals

Which of the following conditions would you prefer to have during your next stay in hospital? A. Staphylococcus aureus (Golden Staph) bloodstream infection; or B. a heart attack?
Silver can be an effective antibacterial when treated in special ways. Silver image via www.shutterstock.com.

Silver shines as antibacterial for medical implants

Joint replacement surgery comes with a big risk of infection. New implant technology that can release silver ions inside the body could help – and without increasing antibiotic resistance.

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