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Articles on Black History Month

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An early 20th-century NAACP map showing lynchings between 1909 and 1918. The maps were sent to politicians and newspapers in an effort to spur legislation protecting Black Americans. Library of Congress

How Black cartographers put racism on the map of America

Mapping is one way African Americans fight for equality and help each other navigate a racially hostile landscape.
School boycott picketers march across the Brooklyn Bridge to the Board of Education in 1964. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Fighting school segregation didn’t take place just in the South

In the 1950s, Harlem mother Mae Mallory fought a school system that she saw as ‘just as Jim Crow’ as the one she had attended in the South.
Students of School Section #13 with teacher, Verlyn Ladd, who taught at the school from 1939 to 1958. Class of 1951, Buxton, Raleigh Township, Ontario. (Buxton National Historic Site & Museum)

Black History: How racism in Ontario schools today is connected to a history of segregation

An 1850 act permitted the creation of separate schools for Protestants, Catholics and for any five Black families. Some white people used the act to force Black students into separate institutions.
Scholar Cheryl Thompson discusses racist stereotypes, including the words used by comedians like Dave Chappelle, pictured here, in Toronto, in 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Thornhill

What’s in a word? How to confront 150 years of racial stereotypes: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 1

In this episode of Don’t Call Me Resilient, host Vinita Srivastava and scholar Cheryl Thompson dive into the meaning of the n-word and the 150 years of racism embedded in it.
This illustration of Little Eva and Uncle Tom by Hammatt Billings appears in the first edition of ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin.’ (Uncle Tom's Cabin & American Culture: A Multi-Media Archive)

What’s in a word? How to confront 150 years of racial stereotypes: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 1 transcript

This is the full transcript for Don’t Call Me Resilient, episode 1: What’s in a word? How to confront 150 years of racial stereotypes and language.
Bill Robinson dancing with Shirley Temple in ‘The Little Colonel.’ (20th Century Fox)

How ‘Uncle Tom’ still impacts racial politics

‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin,’ the best seller of the 19th century, is not a relic from the past. The complex Uncle Tom figure still has a hold over Black politics.
Civil rights leader Wyatt Tee Walker addresses a crowd at St. Phillips AME Church in Atlanta. Afro American Newspapers/Gado/Getty Images

How civil rights leader Wyatt Tee Walker revived hope after MLK’s death

In a sermon two weeks after MLK’s funeral, civil rights leader, Wyatt Tee Walker, urged young seminarians to be hopeful and take action for making change happen. His sermon has valuable lessons today.

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