Menu Close

Articles on Black men's health

Displaying all articles

Adoring fans clamor for an autograph from baseball legend Jackie Robinson in 1962, but Robinson faced slurs, hatred and insults in his early years in the majors. Bettman/

Did racism kill Jackie Robinson?

Major league baseball opens today, and few are likely to give race a thought. When Jackie Robinson integrated MLB in 1947, it was a far different story. Did racism lead to Robinson's early death?
A portrait of George Floyd hangs on a street light pole as police officers stand guard at the Third Police Precinct during a face off with a group of protesters on May 27, 2020 in Minneapolis. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

George Floyd and Ahmaud Arbery deaths: Racism causes life-threatening conditions for black men every day

Police killings of black men gain widespread attention, but black men's life-and-death issues are ignored on a daily basis, a physician who studies health gaps explains.
African Americans have worse health outcomes and die earlier than whites. Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

Study: Racism shortens lives and hurts health of blacks by promoting genes that lead to inflammation and illness

The recent death of Elijah Cummings at age 68 underscores a disturbing statistic: black men die, on average, five years younger than white men. A study shows racism's effects on gene activity.
Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis on April 3, 1968, giving the last speech of his life. He addressed social inequalities, discussing the low pay of garbage workers in that city. Charles Kelly/AP File Photo

How unjust social structures help some but harm others

On April 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis. At the root of the injustice that King preached about is structural inequalities. An expert explains what that means.
Providing tools to help African-American men with prostate cancer make decisions about care can make a big difference. michaeljung/Shutterstock.com

Doctors need to talk through treatment options better for black men with prostate cancer

Prostate cancer outcomes have differed between black men and other ethnic groups for decades. Could improving the way doctors talk and share information with black patients make a difference?
From left to right: Toya Tolson, Shawnte’ Spriggs, Sophia Harrison, Marcella Wright and Deborah Dyson. These women are aging with HIV, sometimes with other diseases and always with other challenges. Aamir Khuller

African-American women with HIV often overlooked, under-supported

More people than ever are living with HIV, but people may overlook the fact that many of these long-term survivors are African-American women. They face unique social and health challenges.
Even when black men attain higher education and greater social status, their health is still not as good as white men’s health, a study this year found. mimagephotography/Shutterstock.com

How wealth inequality in the US affects health inequality in the US: 4 essential reads

If a person in the US has lots of money, he or she has access to some of the best health care in the world. The story is very different for poor people and minorities.
Mourners wait to attend the funeral of Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, Virginia, Aug. 16, 2017 after Heyer was killed attending a rally to protest white nationalism. Julia Rendleman/AP Photo

Why bigotry is a public health problem

As death tolls rise from hate crimes, a psychiatrist wonders: Is it time to treat bigotry like a disease?

Top contributors

More