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Lebanese protesters formed a 105-mile human chain connecting geographically and religiously diverse cities across the country, Oct. 27. 2019. AP Photo/Bilal Hussein

Lebanon uprising unites people across faiths, defying deep sectarian divides

Lebanon's 1989 peace deal ended a civil war by sharing political power between religious factions. That created a society profoundly divided by religion – something today's protesters hope to change.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, center, Republican U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, left, and U.S. Ambassador to Israel David Friedman, right, in the Israeli-held Golan Heights on March 11, 2019. Ronen Zvulun/Pool via AP

Why Trump’s recognition of the Golan Heights as Israeli territory matters

Political leverage aside, it's a major source of water in a parched corner of the world that harbors significant oil deposits.
Syrian Christians and Muslims offer prayers for nuns held by rebels, at the Greek Orthodox Mariamiya Church in Damascus, Syria, in 2013. AP Photo

Syria’s forgotten pluralism and why it matters today

For many centuries, Syrian society has included people of many faiths – Sunni and Shi'i Muslims, Christians and Druze. This past is important to know to understand the present.

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