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Articles on flame retardants

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A study showed that an endangered population of beluga whales in the St. Lawrence River had one of the world’s highest concentrations of the flame retardant, PBDE, in their blubber. (Shutterstock)

Banned flame retardants continue to accumulate in the St. Lawrence River and the whales and fish that live there

Flame retardants are added to consumer products — and end up in the environment and harming aquatic wildlife.
BPA is an industrial chemical used to make hard, clear plastic known as polycarbonate. It’s also used in the lining of some cans. Many hard plastic bottles no longer contain BPA, and it’s illegal to sell baby bottles with BPA in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Science shows that BPA and other endocrine disruptors are harmful to human health, which should incite tighter regulations

There is abundant evidence of the involvement of endocrine disruptors in reproductive dysfunction in several species, including humans.
A U.S. agency has warned the public about the dangers of flame retardants known as organohalogens that are found in baby toys, mattresses, furniture and electronics. (Pexels)

These chemicals are bad for babies and whales: Why haven’t they been banned in Canada?

The U.S. Consumer Protection Safety Commission has recommended a wide-spread ban on an entire class of flame retardants. Here’s how Canada could follow suit.

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