Menu Close

Articles on George Washington

Displaying 1 - 20 of 41 articles

Both Andrew Jackson, left, and Donald Trump presented themselves as men of the people. Jackson, Library of Congress; Trump, Drew Angerer/Getty Images

All American presidents have made spectacles of themselves – and there’s nothing wrong with that

A president’s persona is always a public act. In that way, Trump's shtick – vulgar man of the people – was not exceptional. And every president has had to invent his version of the role.
A 1975 stamp printed in St. Vincent shows U.S. presidents George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, who were all vocally pro-inoculation and vaccination. (Shutterstock)

The U.S. Founding Fathers would want us to get the COVID-19 vaccine

In the early years of the United States, several American presidents were in favour of public health inoculation and vaccination strategies.
Republican nominee Gov. Mike Pence and Democratic nominee Sen. Tim Kaine stand after the vice-presidential debate in Farmville, Va., Oct. 4, 2016. Joe Raedle/Pool via AP

A brief history of presidents snubbing their successors – and why the founders favored civility instead

'Mind your manners' isn't just something your mother told you. Manners – and civility – are an essential component of how things get done in government, and the Founding Fathers knew it.
Donald Trump’s current term as president began on Jan. 20, 2017. It will end on Jan. 20, 2021, with the start of a new term – for him, or someone else. AP Photo/Matt Rourke

President Trump’s term ends on Jan. 20 – the Constitution is clear

The framers of the Constitution were very clear that presidential terms have time limits. Not four years and a day. Not three years and 364 days. Four years.
During a protest, federal police officials stand inside a fence at the federal courthouse in Portland, Oregon, July 25, 2020. (Photo by Ankur Dholakia / AFP via Getty Images

Don’t want federal agents in your city or town? Then protect federal property

No one involved in local government wants to see federal law enforcement agents take over their policing. But a mayor who's also a legal scholar says there's history and precedent for it.
Delegates after Donald Trump accepted the GOP presidential nomination at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio on Thursday, July 21, 2016. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/via Getty

Political conventions today are for partying and pageantry, not picking nominees

Political conventions used to pick presidential nominees in private. Now the public picks the nominee and then the party has a big party at the convention, writes a scholar of US elections.
United States Postal Service mail carrier Frank Colon, 59, departs on his delivery route at the Remcon Circle Post Office amid the coronavirus pandemic on April 30, 2020 in El Paso, Texas. PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Images

How the Postal Service helped stamp identity on America – and continues to deliver a common bond today

The United States Postal Service plays a vital role in US civic life, one that helped shape American society more than 250 years ago and continues to characterize it today.
George Washington would have thought wearing a mask was manly. National Portrait Gallery, Gilbert Stuart portrait/A. Papolu, illustration

George Washington would have so worn a mask

A biographer of George Washington says that the father of the country would have no problem wearing the kind of protective gear that President Trump shuns.
Despite voter dissatisfaction with the Republican and Democratic parties, they are likely to persist. Shutterstock/Victor Moussa

The two-party system is here to stay

Despite the fact that only 38% of Americans say they think the Democratic and Republican parties are doing 'an adequate job,' they're unlikely to disappear.
On Jan. 3, 2012, voters sign in on caucus night at Point of Grace Church in Waukee, Iowa. AP/Evan Vucci

Why the race for the presidency begins with the Iowa caucus

How did a small, rural state become so influential in the presidential nominating process? A political scientist traces the development of the first-in-the-nation Iowa caucus.

Top contributors

More