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Articles on Grieving

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The coffin of Queen Elizabeth, draped in the Royal Standard with the Imperial State Crown placed on top, is carried on a horse-drawn gun carriage of the King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery, during a procession from Buckingham Palace to Westminster Hall on Sept. 14, 2022. (Aaron Chown/Pool via AP)

Decolonize the Queen’s funeral: Why it shouldn’t be a national holiday in Canada

Whose lives are considered worth grieving? Why is Queen Elizabeth’s life and death considered more grievable by authorities than Indigenous people, overdose victims or anyone else?
Andy Rain/EPA/AAP

Why do we mourn people we don’t know?

Grieving the queen’s passing can be different to grieving the loss of someone we were close to. It’s also complicated by politics, colonialism and the contest about who she really was.
A man identified only as Viktor shows his neighbor’s grave in Bucha, Ukraine. It was too dangerous to go to the cemetery. Jana Cavojska/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

How burying the dead keeps the living human

Ukrainian families’ anguish at not being able to bury their loved ones underscores a deep human need, an anthropologist writes.
A funeral director calls relatives of a COVID-19 victim for a virtual viewing before cremation on May 22, 2020 in New York City. Misha Friedman/Getty Images

Different faiths, same pain: How to grieve a death in the coronavirus pandemic

Religious scholars and faith leaders reflect on the death rites cultures have developed to honor the deceased, comfort the living and share the burden of mourning.
A piper plays ‘Amazing Grace’ as local residents look on during a local vigil in Wentworth, N.S., after the worst mass shooting in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Liam Hennessey

Maritime music traditions seek to comfort after Nova Scotia shootings

Virtual music vigils after the Nova Scotia shootings draw on a long tradition of Atlantic Canadian disaster songs and ‘broadside ballads’ to mourn in a time of social distancing.
Expressing grief is an essential part of human nature. Sasha Wolf/Wikimedia Commons.

Coping with bereavement and grief: lessons from history

The need for grief expression is apparent across history and cultures. But how do we know what works? Since the first empirical study into acute grief by Erich Lindemann in 1944, the modern study of grief…
We’ve seen both grieving for and by dictators in recent months. AAP

The grief of dictators: a timeless tale

Dictators under siege in recent times have issued a range of public statements that seem to share a common theme: expressions of grief. But is that merely a construct of the media? Juxtapose the prostrate…

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