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Articles on Heat

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Flooding from hurricanes like Irma in Florida can overwhelm sewer systems and spread pathogens in other ways. Brian Blanco/Getty Images

58% of human infectious diseases can be worsened by climate change – we scoured 77,000 studies to map the pathways

It’s not just mosquitos. Flooding, extreme heat and other climate-related hazards are bringing people into contact with pathogens more often, and affecting people’s ability to fight off disease.
Older adults experiencing homelessness and housing insecurities are some of those most impacted by climate change. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

Better emergency preparedness can protect older adults from climate change

Governments and organizations must listen to older adults’ experiences with extreme heat, flooding and wildfire smoke to create effective policies and programs
Atlanta Braves outfielder Ender Inciarte argues with home plate umpire Doug Eddings during a game against the Arizona Diamondbacks. (AP Photo/Ralph Freso)

Hotter temperatures increase violent behaviour in Major League Baseball

High temperatures make baseball players and coaches more irritable, and are associated with an increase in violence.
Farmers in some regions are being encouraged to preserve and establish grasslands that can survive drought and protect the soil. AP Photo/Mark Rogers

Grim 2022 drought outlook for Western US offers warnings for the future as climate change brings a hotter, thirstier atmosphere

La Niña is only part of the problem. The long-term driver of increasing drought – even in areas getting more rainfall overall – is the rapidly warming climate.
The ocean retains heat for much longer than land does. Aliraza Khatri's Photography via Getty Images

How fast can we stop Earth from warming?

If fossil fuel burning stopped, emerging research suggests air temperatures could level off sooner than expected. But that doesn’t mean the damage stops.
Banana plantation workers in Panama find shade under a vehicle during a break. Jan Sochor/Latincontent/Getty Images

Heat waves hit the poor hardest – a new study calculates the rising impact on those least able to adapt to the warming climate

The risk from heat waves is about more than intensity – being able to cool off is essential, and that’s hard to find in many low-income areas of the world.
A tropical storm’s rain overwhelmed a dam in Thailand and caused widespread flooding in late September. It was just one of 2021’s disasters. Chaiwat Subprasom/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Ocean heat is at record levels, with major consequences

While surface temperatures were about the 6th warmest on record in 2021, the upper oceans were at their hottest – and they’re a stronger indicator of global warming. A top climate scientist explains.
Lava flows from a fissure in the aftermath of eruptions from the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island, May 22, 2018. Andrew Richard Hara/Ena Media Hawaii via Getty Images

Why can’t we throw all our trash into a volcano and burn it up?

Volcanoes might seem like nature’s incinerators, but using them to burn up trash would be dangerous and disrespectful to indigenous people who view them as sacred.
Higher temperatures cause drought, and can lead to food insecurity. Guido Dingemans, De Eindredactie/GettyImages

Extreme heat hurts human health. Its effects must be mitigated – urgently

Many of the temperatures presently being recorded in Africa, and those projected in the next decade, are already close to the limits of human survival, or “liveability”.

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