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Articles on Long-term care homes

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The isolation of long-term care homes to protect residents from COVID-19 revealed how much care was coming from visiting family members. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Long-term care after the COVID-19 disaster: 3 promising ways to move forward

Research on the catastrophic effects of COVID-19 in long-term care homes is shedding light on avenues for positive change.
A worker is seen cleaning surfaces inside Little Mountain Place, a not-for-profit long-term care home in Vancouver where dozens of residents have died in the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Non-profit long-term care homes have lost too many residents to COVID-19

The failure of for-profit long-term care homes to protect residents during the pandemic is well-known. But non-profits also under-performed governments in preventing COVID-19 deaths.
Improving death-friendliness offers further opportunity to improve social inclusion. A death-friendly approach could lay the groundwork for people to stop fearing getting old or alienating those who have. (Shutterstock)

Death-friendly communities ease fear of aging and dying

Death-friendly communities that welcome mortality might help us live better lives and provide better care for people at the end of their lives.
A resident chats with workers at Orchard Villa Long-Term Care in Pickering, Ont., in June 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn)

Resistance, innovation, improvisation: When governments fell short during COVID-19, long-term care workers stepped up

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the scarcity of resources in long-term care. But it has also revealed how staff are undervalued.
A personal support worker with West Neighbourhood House’s Parkdale Assisted Living Program on her way to see a resident at Toronto’s May Robinson apartments seniors’ housing on April 17 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

COVID-19 outbreaks in long-term care highlight the urgent need for paid sick leave

One of the factors that has made COVID-19 so catastrophic in long-term care homes was lack of paid sick leave for low-wage workers.
People wearing face masks ride an attraction at the Playland amusement park at the Pacific National Exhibition, in Vancouver on July 10, 2020. While Canada has done a better job than other countries at managing COVID-19, its death rate still exceeds that of similar nations. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

How Canada compares to other countries on COVID-19 cases and deaths

While Canada has done well compared to countries like the U.S. and the U.K. in containing COVID-19, rates of infection and deaths are higher than in many similar western democracies. Why?
Wheelchairs sit behind Camilla Care in Mississauga, Ont., on May 12, 2020. Fifty residents from the long-term care home have died from COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

We need inquiries into why coronavirus is ravaging long-term care homes

The extraordinary scope and scale of the COVID-19 disaster at Canada’s long-term care centres would seem to warrant a public inquiry. But there are no guarantees there will actually be one.

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