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Articles on Montreal protocol

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People buy produce at a wholesale market in Nakuru, Kenya, on Dec. 24, 2022. James Wakibia/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Installing solar-powered refrigerators in developing countries is an effective way to reduce hunger and slow climate change

Many developing nations have little cold storage and lose much of their perishable food before it gets to markets. Climate-friendly refrigeration can provide huge environmental and social benefits.
Molina speaking about climate change at the Guadalajara International Book Fair in Mexico, Nov. 2018. Leonardo Alvarez/Getty Images

Remembering Mario Molina, Nobel Prize-winning chemist who pushed Mexico on clean energy – and, recently, face masks

Molina, who died on Oct. 8, ‘thought climate change was the biggest problem in the world long before most people did.’ His research on man-made depletion of the ozone layer won the 1995 Nobel Prize.
Temperatures are warming faster in the Arctic than anywhere else in the world. Water and sewer pipes in Iqaluit, Nunavut, are cracking during the winter as the ground shifts. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

The unexpected link between the ozone hole and Arctic warming

New research finds that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other ozone-depleting substances have boosted the effects of climate change in the Arctic.
Sunset at Australia’s Cape Grim observatory, one of the key global background monitoring sites for CFC-11. Paul Krummel/CSIRO

Eastern China pinpointed as source of rogue ozone-depleting emissions

For several years, emissions of CFCs have been rising, in apparent defiance of a global ban in place since 2010. A new global detective effort has traced the source to two eastern Chinese provinces.
False-color image of ozone concentrations above Antarctica on Oct. 2, 2015. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Is Earth’s ozone layer still at risk? 5 questions answered

Earth’s ozone layer shields us from harmful ultraviolet radiation. Nations have been working to reduce ozone-depleting chemicals since the 1980s, but recent studies show that there is still work to do.
Suspected infestation of Macrophomina phaseolina, a “novel” soil pathogen, in the non-fumigated buffer zone of a strawberry field. Julie Guthman

Healthy to eat, unhealthy to grow: Strawberries embody the contradictions of California agriculture

California produces 90 percent of the US strawberry crop, but growers face curbs on toxic chemicals that have helped their industry expand. Can a system centered on mass production become more sustainable?
Clouds over Australia’s Davis Research Station, containing ice particles that activate ozone-depleting chemicals, triggering the annual ozone hole. Barry Becker/BOM/AAD

After 30 years of the Montreal Protocol, the ozone layer is gradually healing

The treaty to limit the destruction of the ozone layer is hailed as the most successful environmental agreement of all time. Three decades on, the ozone layer is slowly but surely returning to health.

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