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Articles on Philippines

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One of the entry points to San Roque, with a makeshift guard shelter on the left. Kim Dovey

‘Forced’ evictions eat away at a Manila community as developer spares the golf course next door

Besides battling the coronavirus pandemic, San Roque residents have long been locked in a bigger struggle for their very survival as a community in the face of home demolitions and relocations.
Residents of Cagayan de Oro survey what’s left of their homes the day after Typhoon Washi hit the Philippines in 2011.

Rebuilding from disaster: it doesn’t end when housing aid projects finish

Months after Typhoon Washi tore through the Philippines in 2011, relocated residents were moving into newly built housing. They soon began modifying and extending homes that didn't meet their needs.
In this November 2013, photo, Typhoon Haiyan survivors pass by hundreds of victims in body bags near Tacloban, Philippines. Haiyan left more than 7,300 people dead or missing. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

Myths about disaster survivors stall the global response to climate change

The Haiyan Typhoon disaster is a cautionary case for climate adaptation and mitigation because it demonstrates the seductiveness of survival myths.
Plastic waste from Australia in Port Klang, Malaysia. Malaysia says it will send back some 3,300 tons of nonrecyclable plastic waste to countries including the U.S., U.K., Canada and Australia. AP Photo/Vincent Thian

As more developing countries reject plastic waste exports, wealthy nations seek solutions at home

A year after China stopped accepting most scrap material exports, other Asian countries are following Beijing's lead, forcing wealthy nations to find domestic solutions for managing their wastes.
Soldiers stand guard near coffins containing the bodies of victims of an explosion that took place inside a catholic cathedral, in southern island of Mindanao on January 28, 2019. NICKEE BUTLANGAN / AFP

Why is peace failing in the Philippines?

After a civil conflict, within five years the majority of modern peace agreements fail. What is causing these negotiated settlements to fall apart?
Worldwide, 1 in 10 presidents and prime ministers has relatives who were already in politics. Europe and Latin America, both democratic regions, have the highest proportion of leaders who come from political families. Shutterstock

Dynasties still run the world

To reach the highest rungs of power, a new study shows, it really helps if your dad was president.
A view of ruins in Marawi city, Lanao del Sur province, Philippines, on May 23 2018. Exactly a year earlier, IS terrorists belonging to the Maute and the Abu Sayyaf groups occupied Marawi, triggering a five-month armed conflict that resulted in over a thousand deaths and left the city in ruins. Linus Escandor II/EPA

Using religion and culture to fight terrorism: lessons from the Philippine military

Indonesia can also apply strategies implemented by the Philippine government to counteract terrorism and radicalism.

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