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Articles on Photojournalism

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Have some healthy skepticism when you encounter images online. tommaso79/Stock via Getty Images Plus

Out-of-context photos are a powerful low-tech form of misinformation

Images without context or presented with text that misrepresents what they show can be a powerful tool of misinformation, especially since photos make statements seem more believable.
At Echo Point lookout in Katoomba, NSW, people watch smoke from the Green Wattle Creek fire beyond The Three Sisters rock formation. AAP/Steven Saphore

Friday essay: seeing the news up close, one devastating post at a time

Instagram bushfire images cut through our news fatigue. This developing brand of photojournalism brings authenticity and a different sense of proximity.
Maria Meza, a 40-year-old migrant woman from Honduras, runs away from tear gas with her 5-year-old twin daughters in front of the border wall in Tijuana, Mexico. Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

Of the trillion photos taken in 2018, which were the most memorable?

Each day, readers are bombarded with shocking, inspiring and informative images. In their overwhelming volume, they can be easily forgotten. Nonetheless, some do rise to the top.
This 1904 photograph showing the massacre of villagers by Dutch KNIL forces in the Indonesian village of Koetö Réh was used by the Dutch to argue for the paternalistic colonial state as protector. We now see it as evidence of imperial atrocity. Collection Nationaal Museum van Wereldculturen.

Ten photos that changed how we see human rights

From depictions of slavery to colonial massacres to contemporary portraits of refugees, photography is a powerful tool in evoking ideas of shared humanity.
Photos of beaming young asylum-seekers with their families aboard HMAS Adelaide in October 2001 told a completely different story to the government’s spurious ‘children overboard’ claims. Courtesy Project SafeCom, Jack H Smit.

Friday essay: worth a thousand words – how photos shape attitudes to refugees

Images move us to act – as last week's episode of Four Corners has shown. Our government has gone to great lengths to suppress photos that humanise asylum seekers – but when they seep out, empathy is aroused.

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