Articles on Physics

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Some pitchers are convinced the balls are being messed with behind the scenes. Aspen Photo/Shutterstock.com

What’s really behind baseball’s home run surge?

Recent changes to the ball seem to be juicing hitters' stats. But could other factors, like the climate and advanced analytics, also be playing a role?
Earth is really ancient, and humans have only been around for a tiny part of that time. NASA

Curious Kids: how was the Earth made?

All the buildings and the cars and the restaurants, and the phones and even everything that's inside of you... it all started with an exploding star, billions of years ago.
The crests (bright) and troughs (dark) of waves spread out after they were produced. The picture applies to both light and sound waves. Titima Ongkantong

A new type of laser uses sound waves to help to detect weak forces

Most people are familiar with lasers. But what about a laser made with sound rather than light? A couple of physicists have now created one that they plan to use for measuring imperceivable forces.
The math of raindrops. Stefan Holm/shutterstock.com

What happens when a raindrop hits a puddle?

Why does the impact of rain in a puddle look different from when it falls elsewhere, like in a lake or the ocean? A 'puddle equation' dives deep into the secret math of ripples.
Pedestrians in Tokyo pass a television screen broadcasting a report on May 4, 2019 that North Korea has fired several unidentified short-range projectiles into the sea off its eastern coast. AP Photo/Koji Sasahara

What geology reveals about North Korea’s nuclear weapons – and what it obscures

North Korea is a major military threat to the US and its Asian allies, but exactly how powerful are its nuclear weapons? An earth scientist explains why it's hard to answer this question.
Héloïse Chochois, "Embedded with Physicists” “Physics Reimagined” coll.

Seven common myths about quantum physics

Quantum physics and its mysteries… And what if this supposedly incomprehensible science weren’t so difficult for non-scientists to understand?
A seven-qubit quantum device at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, N.Y. AP Photo/Seth Wenig

In the future, everyone might use quantum computers

Computers were once considered high-end technology, only accessible to scientists and trained professionals. Today, almost everyone has one. Will quantum computing follow the same path?
Physics laureate Donna Strickland receives the prize from King Carl Gustaf of Sweden during the Nobel Prize award ceremony in Stockholm on Dec. 10, 2018. (Pontus Lundahl/Pool Photo via AP)

Reflections from a Nobel winner: Scientists need time to make discoveries

The winner of the 2018 Nobel Prize in physics says scientists shouldn't feel pressured to do research that has economic or commercial ramifications. Science for the sake of science is more important.

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