Articles on Curious Kids

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Curious Kids: how did the first person evolve?

The oldest known skeleton of our species _Homo sapiens_ is about 300,000 years old. But there was a time when humans didn't exist at all and the world was covered in nothing but slime.
Artist’s interpretation of the inside of the Sun. James Josephides, CAS Swinburne University of Technology

Curious Kids: what does the Sun’s core look like?

If you could go right into the middle of the Sun, everything would be incredibly bright - and perhaps a little bit pink.
Don’t worry that your dog’s world is visually drab. Kevin Short/EyeEm via Getty Images

Do dogs really see in just black and white?

Your faithful friend's view of the world is different than yours, but maybe not in the way you imagine.
Lasers create colorful light shows at concerts, are used by doctors in surgeries – and are used in scientific laboratories. EyeWolf/Getty Images

What is the slowest thing on Earth?

Physicists can use bright, hot lasers to slow atoms down so much that they measure -459 degrees Fahrenheit.
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Curious Kids: why do we burp?

Burping is a normal way for the body to release swallowed air, and often happens after eating or drinking fizzy drinks!
Cookies taste so good. Smell tells us that before we even take a bite. How? Jennifer Pallian/Unsplash

What makes something smell good or bad?

Mmmmmmm. That smells delicious. Wait, how do you know that?
They may look comfy to sit on but you’d plummet through and hit the ground. Sam Schooler/Unsplash

What would it feel like to touch a cloud?

You might have already felt what it would be like inside a cloud made of condensed water vapor.
The spread of diseases is akin to a maze of toppling dominoes. dowell/Getty Images

What’s an epidemiologist?

Epidemiologists focus on diseases among groups of people. They also study the spread of disease among animals.
Dangerous winds batter the south coast of England. AP Photo/Matt Dunham

What makes the wind?

Wind travels all over the world. Where does it come from, and why?

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