Articles on Proportional representation

Displaying all articles

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern arrive at the Commonwealth Heads of Government 2018 meeting in Windsor, England, in April 2018. New Zealand moved from the first-past-the-post electoral system in 1993 to a system that helped put Ardern in power. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

What Canada can learn from New Zealand on electoral reform

Unlike Canada's newly elected House of Commons, New Zealand’s parliament reflects the will of voters. So do other proportional representation systems. Canada has plenty of choice.
Lesotho voters wait patiently to cast their ballot. EPA/Kim Ludbrook

Why Lesotho’s in such a mess and what can be done about it

Politics in Lesotho can look incredibly complicated, with a mish-mash of competing political parties and repeated military interventions. It’s a mess, but it’s not that hard to unravel.
niXerKG/Flickr

Why is the US Green Party so irrelevant?

While Green Party candidates win elections and make policy in Germany, here the Green Party barely registers. Why? Contrasting electoral systems, and the fact that U.S. Greens run as purists, not as politicians.
Without democratic reform, the time ahead for both Britain and the EU looks bleak indeed. Gary Knight/flickr

UK and EU both need major democratic reform to survive Brexit fallout

The Brexit vote was the outcome of the disillusionment and disengagement that have permeated the UK. Many Europeans share that mood, which is why both the UK and EU need radical democratic surgery.
Ed Miliband’s Labour Party gained a swing twice as big as the Conservatives did but lost seats, leading him to resign. EPA/Facundo Arrizabalaga

Voting system gives Tories a result most UK voters didn’t want

Labour, UKIP and the Greens all gained much bigger swings than the Conservatives, but were election losers. The first-past-the-post system let the Tories pick up a swag of seats with a 0.8% swing.
The UK general election could go either way. The one certainty is that the numbers of seats won won’t match the votes for each party. AAP/Newzulu/Stephen Chung

UK election prediction: this week’s result won’t reflect the voters’ will

This week the "mother of parliaments" faces a general election in the UK. The 'first past the post' electoral system means we can't predict the result with certainty, nor expect it to match the vote.
Preference deals and a propensity for people to vote ‘above the line’ gives microparties like Rise Up Australia a greater chance of being elected to the Senate. AAP/Julian Smith

Explainer: how does the Senate voting system work?

The record large Senate ballot papers have probably already annoyed many early voters. Their great length - over a metre in NSW and Victoria – will soon annoy many more voters. However, the real annoyance…

Top contributors

More