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Articles on Electoral reform

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A sign keeping campaigners at a distance in the New Hampshire presidential primary election at the Town Hall in Chichester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016. Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

19th-century political parties kidnapped reluctant voters and printed their own ballots – and that’s why we’ve got laws regulating behavior at polling places

Laws that have long kept campaigners away from voters at polling places may not work in a world where a T-shirt symbol can be interpreted as campaigning.
Allowing MPs to vote electronically would go a long way to promoting gender equity in Canadian politics. (Pixabay)

How e-voting could close Canada’s political gender gap

To boost inclusivity among its ranks, the House of Commons needs parliamentary reform of its voting procedures to allow electronic online voting, or e-voting, for its members.
Members of the Indigenous Amis tribe in traditional costumes participate in the yearly harvest festival in Kaohsiung, Taiwan in September 2018. (Shutterstock)

Taiwan must find ways to enhance Indigenous representation

For Indigenous voters in Taiwan, the current system prevents many of them from having an impact on the election of representatives where they live.
The ‘United We Roll’ convoy of semi-trucks travels the highway near Red Deer, Alta., in February 2019 en route to Ottawa to protest what it called a lack of support for the energy sector and stalled pipelines. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Satisfaction with Canada’s democracy declines significantly in Alberta

Determining whether Canadians are gaining or losing confidence in democracy depends in part on which region one is examining. Contrasting trends in Alberta and Québec provide clues.
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern arrive at the Commonwealth Heads of Government 2018 meeting in Windsor, England, in April 2018. New Zealand moved from the first-past-the-post electoral system in 1993 to a system that helped put Ardern in power. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

What Canada can learn from New Zealand on electoral reform

Unlike Canada's newly elected House of Commons, New Zealand’s parliament reflects the will of voters. So do other proportional representation systems. Canada has plenty of choice.
A resident of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation is photographed while speaking about water and access issues in her community in February 2015. The Shoal Lake community, despite supplying water to the city of Winnipeg, has long been under a boil-water advisory and is only just getting year-round road access. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

We fail our citizens in Canada – and the UN is onto us

Governments in Canada are routinely enacting public policies that primarily benefit economic elites, raising questions about government legitimacy and competency. Who's looking out for us?
New Zealand Labour Party leader Jacinda Ardern, centre, and deputy leader Kelvin Davis, a Maori, far left, answer questions from the media in August in Wellington, New Zealand. Following the Sept. 23 election, Ardern could became the country’s next prime minister if she can convince minor parties to support her. (AP Photo/Nick Perry)

What New Zealand’s vote means for Maori – and potentially First Nations in Canada

While the Maori Party got wiped out in this weekend's New Zealand election, there's still a Maori presence in the country's political system. That's why Canadian First Nations should take note.
President Uhuru Kenyatta and contender Raila Odinga in happier times. The two are now embroiled in a bitter political contest. Reuters/Thomas Mukoya

The thin line between electoral credibility and political stability in Kenya

Democracy doesn't seem to work within societies governed by politics of ethnicity. Instead, elections continue to offer up the hard choice between electoral credibility and political stability.

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