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Articles on Quebec

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People gather in Kingston, Ont., to protest COVID-19 vaccine mandates and masking measures on Nov. 14, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg 

COVID-19 vaccine mandates would likely face legal hurdles in Canada

Can the government mandate vaccines? Canadians have rights to make decisions about vaccination, but these rights are not absolute, and do not mean those decisions will have no consequences.
Jean-Marc Vallée attends a press conference to promote the film ‘Demolition’ at the Toronto International Film Festival in September 2015. His unfinished work was an ode to human complexity. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Québec filmmaker and producer Jean-Marc Vallée told stories of human complexity

If Vallée’s films are so moving, it is because for him, cinema and television are an act of communication. He said he hoped his stories would “give back a little.”
Police in Montréal stop and question a woman at the start of a curfew in Quebec from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. intended to help curb the rise of infections due to COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Peter McCabe

The dangers of Québec’s pandemic curfew and the expansion of police discretionary powers

There’s a continued necessity to develop the legal limits of police discretion, especially in advance of subsequent pandemic related restrictions that may occur.
The Parc-Extension neighbourhood has a large number of immigrants from Southeast Asia. A survey reveals that, far from what you hear in the media, they integrate very well and are enjoying their lives. Shutterstock

Parc-Extension: How immigrants are integrating into Montréal’s most multi-ethnic neighbourhood

Security and high-quality interpersonal relationships are essential factors for immigrants to create a happy life.
Left to right, Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, Finance Minister Allan MacEachen and Québec Premier René Lévesque attend the constitutional conference in Ottawa on Nov. 5, 1981 — the morning after eight premiers hastily pieced together a constitutional accord. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ron Poling

Canada inked a landmark constitutional accord 40 years ago — and it’s still causing problems

The constitutional reform agreement reached in November 1981 has produced a bitterness in national relations that lingers to this day and imposes on Canada a cost that has weakened the nation.
Six-year-old Makai'ryn Terrio, centre, cools off with his brothers as they play in water fountains in Montréal. The city had its hottest August on record. The Canadian Press/Graham Hughes

What climate change means for southern Ontario and Québec

Southern Québec is warming twice as rapidly as the rest of the world due to the progressive loss of snow cover. An average annual warming of 3 C to 6 C is expected by the end of the century.
In February, the Innu Council of Ekuanitshit and the Minganie Regional County Municipality declared the Muteshekau Shipu (Magpie River) a legal person, a move that may provide greater certainty for this majestic river’s future. (Boreal River)

Rights for nature: How granting a river ‘personhood’ could help protect it

A recent declaration of a river as a legal person in Canada recognizes Indigenous laws and governance, and champions people as the guardians of nature.
Worried about another 1980s-style constitutional crisis? Don’t be. There may be less than meets the eye to Québec Premier François Legault’s recent constitutional proposals. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

What’s behind Québec’s latest, and largely superficial, constitutional gambit

Québec Premier François Legault’s recent constitutional proposals have caused alarm. But it’s largely a game aimed at finding common ground between federalist and separatist voters in the province.
In Québec, the biggest child care provider by far is schools. Here, children raise their hands at a care centre in Montréal in August 2006. CP PHOTO/Ian Barrett

Ottawa’s $10-a-day child care promise should heed Québec’s insights about balancing low fees with high quality

As provinces and territories beyond Québec develop early learning and care plans, they should be aware of the pitfalls of taking shortcuts in response to parent demand.
The Northern Bruce Peninsula in Ontario has been a popular domestic tourism destination during COVID-19. Luke Smith/Unsplash

The COVID-19 pandemic has created regional tourism hotspots as big cities suffer

Large Canadian cities, usually major tourist destinations, have have experienced drastic declines in tourists and tourism spending while some regional hotspots have been overwhelmed with visitors.
People take part in a demonstration in Montréal in November 2020 to protest against government funding for infrastructure projects at two English-language educational institutions and also calling on the city to set up a body to protect the French language. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

New official languages plan aims to end the decline of French in Canada

The federal government’s ambitious new plan to modernize the 51-year-old Official Languages Act is the most significant proposal on the status of French in Canada since 1982.
A resident chats with workers at Orchard Villa Long-Term Care in Pickering, Ont., in June 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn)

Resistance, innovation, improvisation: When governments fell short during COVID-19, long-term care workers stepped up

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the scarcity of resources in long-term care. But it has also revealed how staff are undervalued.
According to a recent survey of public servants by the Commissioner of Official Languages, more than 44 per cent of French-speakers are uncomfortable using French at work. CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

A ‘French malaise’ is eroding bilingualism in Canada’s public service

A recent survey reveals a general uneasiness about using French among both francophone and anglophone public servants in administrative regions where bilingualism is required.
A young girl places a candle during a vigil for the victims of the mosque shooting on Jan, 30, 2017 in Québec City. In the years since the attack, little has been done to combat the Islamophobia that caused it. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Remembering the Québec City mosque attack: Islamophobia and Canada’s national amnesia

Four years after the violent attack on worshippers at Québec City’s central mosque, the federal government has said it will honour the victims with a national day of remembrance.
A Scottish Saltire flag hangs in the window of an apartment in Edinburgh, Scotland, next to the EU flag in August 2020. Scotland could vote to separate from the U.K. in 2021. (AP Photo/David Cheskin)

Scotland could vote to separate in 2021, testing Canada’s independence formula

Scotland’s renewed push for independence is not only similar to Québec’s — there are also lessons for Scottish politicians in Canadian law on the concept of separation.
This pandemic year has prompted a lot of reinvention and food favourites are no exception, including the traditional tourtière. (The Conversation Canada)

Poutine in a pie: Would you eat a ‘tourtine’ this holiday season?

Culinary invention is a reinterpretation of heritage. The success of the tourtine in this pandemic year suggests that we feel the need to rethink the traditional dishes of the holiday season.

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