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Articles on Quebec

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The experimental methods available today allow us to break the brain down into its elementary components in order to understand its functions and dysfunctions. (Shutterstock)

The Douglas-Bell Canada Brain Bank: a goldmine for research on brain diseases

Montréal is home to one of the world’s largest brain banks, the Douglas-Bell Canada Brain Bank, where discoveries about different neurological and psychiatric diseases are made.
Too few Canadian fathers take parental leave. That’s because parental leave is framed as an employment policy rather than as care/work policy that promotes greater sharing of both paid and unpaid care work between parents. (Shutterstock)

Improved employment policies can encourage fathers to be more involved at home

If more Canadian fathers are to harness the benefits of parental leave and remote work, we need to design employment and care policies in ways that recognize every family’s unique needs.
A family harvests their wheat crop near Cremona, Alta. Pesticide use is common throughout Canadian agriculture. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Striving for transparency: Why Canada’s pesticide regulations need an overhaul

Canada is long-overdue for scientifically-driven, robust and transparent pesticide regulation. A newly created Science Advisory Committee aims to address this.
The majestic St. Lawrence River, a jewel of economic, historical and environmental importance, reminds us of the need to preserve this essential ecosystem. (Ludovic Pascal)

Oxygen in the St. Lawrence Estuary is decreasing – and having a major impact on small animals living there

The waters of the St. Lawrence are running out of breath and bottom-dwelling organisms are already feeling the effects. Here’s how ecosystems are reacting.
The industrialization of the fishing industry and changes in the environment have raised many issues about the management of our fisheries. (Fanny Fronton)

Gulf of St. Lawrence: Analyzing fish blood can show us how healthy they are

Blood isn’t sterile, and analyzing the bacteria in it could help assess the health of fish and prevent the collapse of their populations.
Forest fires were mostly started by lightning. Their spread was then exacerbated by a lack of precipitation and abnormally high temperatures. (Victor Danneyrolles)

Québec’s summer 2023 wildfires were the most devastating in 50 years. Is the worst yet to come?

The forest fires of the summer of 2023 in Québec were devastating. It was the worst year in 50 years. But with climate change, the worst may be yet to come.
Not only do corals inhabit the cold waters of the St. Lawrence, but the species that holds the title of largest marine invertebrate on the planet is present at the entrance to the Gulf. (Fisheries and Oceans Canada)

Discover 6 fascinating animals that live at the bottom of the St. Lawrence River

In the vast St. Lawrence River, an impressive variety of animals live on the seabed. This group of organisms is called benthos or benthic invertebrates.
A better understanding of the interactions between snow cover and forest will help improve hydrological models and thus ensure public protection against flooding. (Benjamin Bouchard)

Understanding the dynamics of snow cover in forests can help us predict flood risks

A better understanding of the interactions between the boreal forest and snow will make it possible to improve hydrological models and ensure optimal management of the resource.
Protesters demonstrate against the eviction of a homeless encampment under the Ville-Marie expressway in Montréal in July 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christinne Muschi

Montréal’s ‘mixed’ police squads don’t help the city’s unhoused people — they cause more harm

Front-line workers who support unhoused people say far from being a form of support, mixed police squads add a layer of surveillance and harassment.
Kwetiio, Kahentinetha and Karakwine (from left to right), three of the six Mohawk Mothers seeking to uncover unmarked graves at the former Royal Victoria Hospital in Montréal. (Justin Heritage)

Mapping unmarked graves: Why the Mohawk Mothers are fighting McGill University

Debates over what “mapping” means show how Indigenous communities still have to advocate for and defend their cartographic methods in order to uphold their connections to the land.
A recent study has found that Canadians are highly motivated to save money in preparation of long-term care. (Shutterstock)

Older Canadians’ savings are shaped by their long-term care preferences

While both nursing homes and home care impose financial burdens, their differing structures can influence how older Canadians save money.
Street sign for Fford Pen Llech, said to be the world’s steepest street, with text in English and in Welsh. Approximately 20% of Wales residents are fluent in Welsh, and the goverment is striving to increase that percentage.“ Wikimedia

Protecting endangered languages feels right, but does it really help people?

Media accounts on endangered languages abound, but they don’t always explore how to materially help native speakers. Peer-reviewed research shows that such efforts don’t always have positive effects.
Narrow-leaved kalmia is an invasive plant typical of boreal ecosystems. Its proliferation can hinder the reforestation of areas subject to disturbances. (Jacques Ibarzabal/iNaturalist)

Making the most out of boreal plant resources

Boreal plants produce molecules that are valued by traditional medicines and inspire the development of medicinal products by contemporary chemists.
A protest demanding justice for Joyce Echaquan in Montréal in October 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Québec’s cultural awareness training makes flawed assumptions that do not prioritize the safety of Indigenous people

Cultural awareness training for health-care workers places focus on individual biases rather than tackling the systemic problems that negatively impact Indigenous patients.
Woodland caribou of the Pipmuacan herd. The effects of predation and habitat loss have greatly contributed to the decline of caribou in southern Nitassinan. (Stéphane Bourassa, Canadian Forest Service)

A hundred years of logging threatens the Innu link to their land

A realistic look at forest management on the Nitassinan of Pessamit, based on data from the Québec government’s forest inventories.

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