Articles on Canada

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Treaty 4, which covered present-day southern Saskatchewan and a small part of western Manitoba was negotiated and signed at Qu'appelle Lakes. Here Saulteux from Upper Assiniboine River, Oct. 16, 1887 were promised for every ‘man, woman and child $1,200 …blankets and other articles.’ (Library and Archives Canada/Natural Resources Canada fonds/PA-050799).

Historical lawsuit affirms Indigenous laws on par with Canada’s

A recent historical win for Ontario First Nations against the government of Canada is as significant for the legal process, which took into account Anishinaabe law, as it is for the win itself.
Indigenous women’s activism in Canada has a long history. The organizing work of Isabelle McNab, first president of the Saskatchewan Women’s Indian Association, can be seen as the precursor to later activism like this First Nations Idle No More protest for better treatment of Indigenous peoples at the Douglas-Peace Arch near Surrey, B.C., on Jan. 5, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Hidden from history: Indigenous women’s activism in Saskatchewan

Built on historical research, this article tells the resilient, fascinating and rarely told history of Indigenous women's organizing and resistance in Saskatchewan.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks about the federal government’s newly imposed carbon tax at an event in Toronto in October 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Rethinking Canada’s climate policy from the ground up

Canada's top-down approach to designing its climate policy has failed. It needs to find ways to engage with individuals.
Protesters in front the Supreme Court of Canada in 2013 when the court was hearing arguments on the constitutionality of Canada’s prostitution laws. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada’s laws designed to deter prostitution, not keep sex workers safe

Canada’s prostitution laws are based on the idea that prostitution is dangerous. Legalizing prostitution doesn’t eliminate the risks of violence and psychological harm.
Honduran migrant Elizabeth Umanzor hugs her six-year-old daughter Gina outside the tent where their family of five is sleeping at an sports complex sheltering more than 5,000 Central American migrants in Tijuana, Mexico, Nov. 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

How to develop the mental health care that refugees really need

Research shows that when refugees arrive in Canada they find a health system that is ill-equipped to meet their complex social and psychological needs.
Journalists who cover illegal operations like logging at this site in northern Sagaing division, Myanmar, can face threats and violence. AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe

Why covering the environment is one of the most dangerous beats in journalism

Reporters who cover environment and natural resource issues are commonly threatened and harassed around the world. Some have been killed for coverage that threatens powerful interests.
Few medical schools offer training in addictions medicine and most doctors feel they lack the specialist expertise to deal with the inpatient opioid crisis. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan)

How the opioid crisis is disrupting hospital care

Canadian hospitals are ill-equipped to deal with the inpatient opioid crisis. Lack of specialist addictions care puts patients and staff at risk.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shakes hands with B.C. Premier John Horgan at a news conference where LNG Canada announced its decision to build an export facility in Kitimat, B.C. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

How to make the liquefied natural gas industry more sustainable

Burning natural gas produces less greenhouse gases than coal or oil. But the methane emissions associated with natural gas production and liquefaction threaten to erode its environmental benefits.
Brazil, home to the Amazon, is one of just five ‘mega-wilderness’ countries. CIFOR

Earth’s wilderness is vanishing, and just a handful of nations can save it

More than two-thirds of Earth's remaining wilderness is in the hands of just five countries, according to a new global map. A concerted conservation effort is needed to save our last wild places.
Many classroom assessment strategies have a positive impact on student learning but, because they are not standardized, can also contribute to the problem of grade inflation. (Shutterstock)

Educators must commit now to tackle grade inflation

Recent news that at least one Ontario university adjusts for grade inflation during the undergraduate application process is a call to action -- for long-term educational change.

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