Articles on Justin Trudeau

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The number of Canadian peacekeeping forces deployed around the world is at an all-time low. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg

UN Security Council: Actually, the world doesn’t need more Canada

Canada sees itself as a peacekeeper and an independent voice in global affairs. The recent vote for a seat on the UN Security Council shows the world doesn't agree with that image.
The Security Council meets at the United Nations headquarters in New York to discuss the situation in Syria in 2019. On this issue, as with many others, the Council’s paralysis had tragic consequences. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

The UN Security Council isn’t working. Will it ever be completely reformed?

Canada's recent failure to gain a seat on the UN Security Council indicates the country still has work to do but also highlights the need to reform the powerful body.
People walk on the words ‘defund the police’ that was painted in bright yellow letters in downtown Washington, D.C., on June 7, 2020. The death of unarmed Black man George Floyd in Minneapolis sparked worldwide protests against police brutality. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

Canada should enshrine police body cameras into law

To use body cameras effectively, police need to be guided by law, not policy.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addresses reporters after the Munich Security Conference where he was seeking support for Canada’s candidacy for a seat on the United Nations Security Council. Getting that seat will not be easy. The Canadian Press/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada’s efforts to get on the UN Security Council will likely end in failure

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has campaigned hard to get Canada a seat at the UN Security Council but a variety of factors may thwart him.
Instagram users may be more influenced politically by their social connections on the platform than they are by political accounts. (Dean Moriarty, Pixabay)

Social ties, not politicians, may drive political participation on Instagram

A survey shows respondents who used Instagram for political information during the 2019 federal election were more likely to interact with people they knew, not political accounts.
People keep social distance amid concerns over the coronavirus outbreak during a protest against the coalition deal between Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Benny Gantz and government corruption in Tel Aviv on May 2, 2020. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)

Canada missing in action on Israel’s proposed annexation of the West Bank

In 2015, Justin Trudeau announced that 'Canada is back' and promised to support a rules-based international order. Yet Canada has maintained the previous Conservative government's pro-Israel stance.
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in London in December 2019. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

Canada needs to see the U.S. and its trade motives clearly

Canada’s free-trade obsession has made us overly reliant on global supply chains. That's a huge unforced error given that 19 years ago, 9/11 showed us just how quickly border policy can change.
Traders sell food at a busy market in Kampala, Uganda on March 26, 2020. COVID-19 could devastate impoverished communities in Africa and contribute to a second wave of the global pandemic, which is why Canada must not adopt a ‘Canada First’ response. (AP Photo/Ronald Kabuubi)

Canada must act globally in response to the coronavirus

The COVID-19 pandemic demands that Canada and other rich countries do all they can to slow the global spread of the virus — for the health security of people around the world, and for Canadians too.
U.S. President Donald Trump has often been documented bullshitting. In a business setting, however, bullshitters can be harder to identify. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Bullshit is everywhere. Here’s how to deal with it at work

Understanding the distinction between bullshit and lying is essential. We can reveal a lie by uncovering the truth, but dealing effectively with bullshit is more complicated.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is seen with Québec Premier Francois Legault in December 2018 at the opening of a first ministers’ meeting. Legault has accused Trudeau of insulting Québecers because of the federal Court Challenges Program. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Canadians are entitled to legal help to protect their Charter rights

Canada's Charter of Rights and Freedoms doesn't mean much if it can't be enforced. That's why the Court Challenges Program is so important — no matter what the Québec premier says.
Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs from left, Rob Alfred, John Ridsdale and Antoinette Austin, take part in a rally in Smithers, B.C., in January 2020 against the Coastal GasLink project. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Coastal GasLink pipeline dispute is a nation-to-nation matter

Reconciliation cannot be achieved by the brute force of the RCMP or the self-interests of energy companies.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson during the G7 Summit in Biarritz, France, in August 2019. Can the U.K. and Canada forge a post-Brexit trade deal? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada-U.K. free trade: A post-Brexit opportunity

The U.K. is now in the unenviable position of having to negotiate multiple trade deals following Brexit. Here's why it should start with Canada.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pauses as he speaks during a news conference in Ottawa on Jan. 11. Trudeau says Iran must take full responsibility for mistakenly shooting down a Ukrainian jetliner, killing all 176 civilians on board. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Canada’s non-diplomacy puts Canadians at risk in an unstable Middle East

The downing of Flight PS752 isn't just the result of Canada being caught in U.S.-Iran crossfire. It's also the result of an unnecessarily aggressive posture of Canada's own against Iran in 2012.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shakes hands with Ontario Premier Doug Ford on Parliament Hill in November 2019. Ford says he wants to work hand-in-hand with Ottawa. But apparently not when it comes to the environment. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

‘New and improved’ Doug Ford doesn’t extend to the environment

There's been one notable exception to Doug Ford's supposed willingness to change direction: the environment.
Canada’s mission in Afghanistan under former prime minister Stephen Harper is an example of how a minority situation for a government can influence foreign policy. Harper is seen here in Kandahar in May 2011, shortly after winning a majority government. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

How minority governments can influence foreign policy

Minority parliaments create a political environment that discourages cabinet from bold acts. That means Justin Trudeau's foreign policy will like be more risk-averse that it was before.
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney and Chrystia Freeland meet in Edmonton after she was named deputy prime minister and minister of intergovernmental affairs. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Amber Bracken

Chrystia Freeland will have to navigate misogyny in her new roles

If successful, Chrystia Freeland could help bolster national unity and Canada’s relationships with the U.S. and Mexico. But relentless sexist attacks against her could derail progress.

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