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Articles on Science journalism

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Public service announcements, news articles and social media posts are all part of the coronavirus messaging landscape. Noam Galai via Getty Images

COVID-19 public health messages have been all over the place – but researchers know how to do better

During the pandemic, clear and reliable health communication can literally be a life-and-death issue. Researchers who focus on the science of science communication highlight strategies that work.
If what you’re reading seems too good to be true, it just might be. Mark Hang Fung So/Unsplash

6 tips to help you detect fake science news

Whenever you hear about a new bit of science news, these suggestions will help you assess whether it's more fact or fiction.
(Unsplash/Roman Kraft)

Behind a lot of flashy headlines may lie questionable scientific claims - what should people be aware of when reading the news?

Behind a lot of news headlines often lie either questionable, oversold or misinterpreted research findings. So what should readers be aware of when reading news that contain scientific claims?
Our decision-making and conduct is influenced by what we read, see or hear. (Shutterstock)

Why we see hope for the future of science journalism

Science is a part of everyday life. Science journalists can do more to connect science to the public.
Still from An Inconvenient Truth (2006) (Handout)

An inconvenient truth about An Inconvenient Truth

Eleven years after its release, An Inconvenient Truth, the iconic climate documentary, has spawned a sequel. But did the original do more harm than good by polarizing Americans on climate change?
Will Bill Nye’s new show find a wider audience than Neil deGrasse Tyson’s ‘Cosmos’ did? Vince Bucci/Invision for the Television Academy/AP Images

Can Bill Nye – or any other science show – really save the world?

Popular programming that focuses on science tends to not actually be all that popular. Bringing in new audiences who aren't already up to speed on science topics is a challenge.
Peer-reviewed journals are the gold standard for scientific publishing. Shutterstock

How we edit science part 3: impact, curiosity and red flags

In part three of our series on reporting science, we look at what's news, different types of science stories and red flags to watch out for.
Stories in the media are often the first or even the only way that people hear about science and medical news. So we need to get the reporting right. from www.shutterstock.com

Essays on health: reporting medical news is too important to mess up

Health reporting requires asking the right questions and doing quality research. But specialist skills are also handy, especially when it comes to knowing the language and processes of science.
Scientists themselves may be the key to finding the right balance. Scales image via www.shutterstock.com.

Accurate science or accessible science in the media – why not both?

The public loses when their only choices are inaccessible, impenetrable journal articles or overhyped click-bait about science. Scientists themselves need to step up and help bridge the divide.

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