Articles on Science communication

Displaying 1 - 20 of 171 articles

For some parents, the decision to vaccinate requires more than just objective evidence. rocketboom/flickr

Australians’ attitudes to vaccination are more complex than a simple ‘pro’ or ‘anti’ label

Whilst most parents do vaccinate, health professionals often find it difficult to talk with those who are hesitant or decline. A new resource provides information and communication support.
The March for Science will build on other rallies that encourage the use of scientific evidence in forming policy. AAP Image/Mal Fairclough

Why we’re marching for science in Australia

March for Science rallies will take place in cities around Australia on Saturday 22 April. A volunteer organiser explains why he and others are participating.
Stories in the media are often the first or even the only way that people hear about science and medical news. So we need to get the reporting right. from www.shutterstock.com

Essays on health: reporting medical news is too important to mess up

Health reporting requires asking the right questions and doing quality research. But specialist skills are also handy, especially when it comes to knowing the language and processes of science.
Wes Mountain/The Conversation

Eight podcasts to get between your ears this year

The Conversation asked eight authors from across its sections to tell us about their favourite podcasts – and why you should tune in.
It’s important to get the research across to and understood by decision-makers. Shutterstock/Rawpixel.com

Listen up: a plan to help scientists get their research heard by decision-makers

Research comes with risk and uncertainty so getting the right message across to the people who matter can be a challenge for scientists. A new plan out today hopes to change that.
There’s more to it than political beliefs. Buttons image via www.shutterstock.com.

Why do science issues seem to divide us along party lines?

Social scientists investigate when and why liberals and conservatives mistrust science. The apparent split may be more about cultural and personal beliefs than feelings about science itself.
Ben Goldacre says that greater transparency on research findings could increase the public’s faith in essential medicines. Shutterstock

Speaking with: Bad Pharma author Ben Goldacre about how bad research hurts us all

Bad Pharma author Ben Goldacre about how bad research hurts us all. The Conversation, CC BY36.4 MB (download)
Darren Saunders speaks with Bad Pharma author Ben Goldacre about bad medical research reporting, and how greater transparency in research practices could improve public trust in science and medicine.

Top contributors

More