Articles on Science communication

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The message might not come through if you put all your communication eggs in one theoretical basket. buydeephoto/Shutterstock.com

Facts versus feelings isn’t the way to think about communicating science

Reports of facts' death have been greatly exaggerated. Effective communication jettisons the false dilemma in favor of a more holistic view of how people take in new information on contentious topics.
A shot of fake news now and your defenses are raised in the future? funnyangel/Shutterstock.com.

Inoculation theory: Using misinformation to fight misinformation

Does science have an answer to science denial? Just as being vaccinated protects you from a later full-blown infection, a bit of misinformation explained could help ward off other cases down the road.
People seem to think industry-funded research belongs in the garbage. mllejules/Shutterstock.com

People don’t trust scientific research when companies are involved

Scientists need funding to do their work. But a new study finds turning to industry partners taints perceptions of university research, and including other kinds of partners doesn't really help.
Will Bill Nye’s new show find a wider audience than Neil deGrasse Tyson’s ‘Cosmos’ did? Vince Bucci/Invision for the Television Academy/AP Images

Can Bill Nye – or any other science show – really save the world?

Popular programming that focuses on science tends to not actually be all that popular. Bringing in new audiences who aren't already up to speed on science topics is a challenge.
Rhetoric can teach scientists how to effectively communicate what’s going on in the lab to the rest of us. Joshua Mayer

Defending science: How the art of rhetoric can help

If you've only ever paired the idea of 'rhetoric' with 'empty,' think again. Rhetoricians of science have concrete techniques to share with researchers to help them communicate their scientific work.
What happens to their credibility when scientists take to the streets? February 2017 Stand Up for Science rally in Boston. Adam Salsman

Can March for Science participants advocate without losing the public’s trust?

The research community tends to assume advocacy doesn't mix with objectivity. One study suggests there's room for scientists to make real-world recommendations without compromising their trusted status.
For some parents, the decision to vaccinate requires more than just objective evidence. rocketboom/flickr

Australians’ attitudes to vaccination are more complex than a simple ‘pro’ or ‘anti’ label

Whilst most parents do vaccinate, health professionals often find it difficult to talk with those who are hesitant or decline. A new resource provides information and communication support.
The March for Science will build on other rallies that encourage the use of scientific evidence in forming policy. AAP Image/Mal Fairclough

Why we’re marching for science in Australia

March for Science rallies will take place in cities around Australia on Saturday 22 April. A volunteer organiser explains why he and others are participating.
Stories in the media are often the first or even the only way that people hear about science and medical news. So we need to get the reporting right. from www.shutterstock.com

Essays on health: reporting medical news is too important to mess up

Health reporting requires asking the right questions and doing quality research. But specialist skills are also handy, especially when it comes to knowing the language and processes of science.

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