Articles on Research

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Even if they are not treated, only about three per cent of men will die of prostate cancer over their lifetime, most in their 70s or 80s. (Shutterstock)

Movember shavedown: Why you should not get your prostate checked

A family physician and public health researcher explains why he isn't getting a prostate cancer test in Movember or at any time in the near future.
Is the rapid increase in research actually paying off? Shutterstock

No, we aren’t running out of new ideas

Academics argue that increasing amounts of R&D isn't translating into greater productivity. But the problem may lay elsewhere in the economy.
Protesters carry signs during a march for science Saturday, April 22, 2017, in Denver. AP Photo/David Zalubowski

Want to change federal policies? Here’s how

One of the best ways to shape public policy is for experts to submit detailed, technical information through the public comment process.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Dr. Mona Nemer, Canada’s new chief science adviser, check out a robot that launches balls, with science fair participants Van Bernat and Kate O'Melia of Governor Simcoe Secondary School in St. Catharines, Ont., on Parliament Hill in September. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick)

Science in Canada needs funding, not photo-ops

Science funding still falls short of 2005 levels. It's time for Canada's government to fix that problem, before it's too late.
One reason universities might not achieve good student outcomes is that they do not spend enough money on teaching. Shutterstock

Performance funding is not the way to improve university teaching

Universities now have the incentive and flexibility to respond to student interests, and we shouldn't distract them with policy changes that could make things worse.
Coca-Cola executives Robert C. Goizueta and Donald R. Keough toast cans of ‘New Coke’ – a product rollout that’s considered one of the biggest business blunders of all time. AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler

The best way to deal with failure

According to new research, the way you respond could determine whether or not you'll repeat the same mistake in the future.

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