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Articles on Voting system

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Mail-in ballots for the California recall election are processed in Pomona, Calif., on Sept. 9, 2021. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Some states are making it harder to vote, some are making it easier – but it’s too soon to say if this will affect voter turnout in 2022

Thirty-six states have adopted new voting laws since the 2020 election. But it’s not yet clear if these laws will actually affect voter turnout in the 2022 midterms.
Staff of the House of Representatives review Illinois’ Electoral College vote report in January 2017. Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

The Electoral College is surprisingly vulnerable to popular vote changes

Mathematically speaking, the Electoral College is built to virtually ensure narrow victories, making it very susceptible to manipulation and disinformation.
Is the voting booth a stumbling block? AP Photo/John Minchillo

Voting could be the problem with democracy

Randomly selecting citizens to take turns governing offers the promise of reinvigorating struggling democracies, making them more responsive to citizen needs and preferences.
By hand: voters use paper and pencil to cast their ballots in the 2016 Australian federal election. AAP/Paul Miller

Electronic voting may be risky, but what about vote counting?

There’s something about seeing the ballot process take place – the vote, the count – that inspires confidence. That wouldn’t be the same with any electronic voting system.
Australia continues to enjoy voter turnout levels that are the envy of voluntary-voting regimes the world over. AAP/Lukas Coch

Election explainer: why do I have to vote, anyway?

The majority of Australians approve of compulsory voting – and have done so for decades. The nay-sayers continue to be a minority.
While there may not be too many voters in swimsuits or shorts at this year’s winter poll, increasing numbers of Australians are voting before election day. AAP/Paul Miller

Pre-polling gains popularity, but makes life harder for politicans and parties

A growing number of people are pre-polling, or voting before election day. This has significant implications for the parties in terms of rolling out policy and voter engagement.
A line snakes down the sidewalk at Western High School in Las Vegas during the Nevada Republican presidential caucus. David Becker/Reuters

Why it’s time to end in-person voting for good

Simply by voting in a church, you’re more likely to support a conservative cause or candidate.

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