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Articles on WannaCry

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Ransomware attacks often strike local government computer systems, which poses a challenge for protecting elections. PRImageFactory/iStock via Getty Images

Ransomware can interfere with elections and fuel disinformation – basic cybersecurity precautions are key to minimizing the damage

A ransomware attack on election-related government computers in a Georgia county raises the specter of more disruptions for Election Day voting and vote tabulation.
If they cannot be completely prevented, detecting computer attacks as early as possible helps to limit their costs. Shutterstock

Cybersecurity: high costs for companies

The cost of computer attacks to companies is difficult to quantify precisely. One thing is certain, however: it is constantly improving. As is the case with defensive measures...
More cryptocurrencies appear all the time. Wit Olszewski/Shutterstock.com

Are cryptocurrencies a dream come true for cyber-extortionists?

Cybercriminals increasingly depend on e-currencies to profit from their misdeeds. They, and their potential victims, could be driving some of the growth in cryptocurrency markets.
When is it okay for the government to keep a secret? sharpshutter via shutterstock.com

Should spies use secret software vulnerabilities?

What's the best way for spy agencies to protect the public: secretly exploit software flaws to gather intelligence, or warn the world and avert malicious cyberattacks?
The market for exploiting software vulnerabilities can be traced back to the 90s where “phreaking” - modifying telecommunications technology - was popular. Jennifer/Flickr

What the underground market for ransomware looks like

The underground market for software vulnerabilities has been growing steadily since the 1990s, so the latest WannaCry could be a sign of things to come.

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