Articles on Behaviour

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A man browsing the shoe department in a shopping centre. Can he really afford new shoes, and does he really need them? Alex Buirds/Wikimedia

Why we perceive ourselves as richer than we think we are

Under some circumstances, people may feel wealthier than they actually are and this makes them psychologically more prone to increase their spending, as well as their borrowing.
Children can become more and more skilled in the art of oppositional behaviour, and increasingly harder to discipline. Suzanne Tucker/Shutterstock

Evidence-based parenting: how to deal with aggression, tantrums and defiance

Some children's tantrums, irritability and defiance well exceed that typically found in healthy children of the same age. This can be overwhelming for parents, especially as children grow.
Pan having sex with a goat, statue from Villa of the Papyri, Herculaneum, 1752. Marie-Lan Nguyen/Wikimedia

Why animal orgasm matters to our moral universe

The vast discrepancy between abhorrence of bestiality and acceptance of slaughtering on animals suggests that thinking imaginatively about animal orgasm may help us to be more compassionate toward animals.
Trolls tend to downplay the impact of their abusive online behaviour on their victims and seem to relish the mayhem they cause. Let’s use this to help them lift their game. from www.shutterstock.com

How empathy can make or break a troll

Trolls tend to know the impact they'll have, but don't seem to care. So, how do we use our new findings to help stop this seemingly pointless, harmful behaviour?
Swimming in synchrony is a fundamental social behaviour for dolphins and is thought to reinforce their bonds. Parc Astérix

Synchronised swimming makes dolphins more optimistic

A new study of captive dolphins has found that those engaging in synchronised swimming make more optimistic judgements about an unknown event.
If you want your New Year’s resolutions to last longer than the party, you need to create new habits. But how? from www.shutterstock.com

A behaviourist’s guide to New Year’s resolutions

If you want to stick to your New Year's resolutions, a behaviourist's approach might help you create and keep new, healthy habits.
The logic is that violence is a choice, so men can be reasonably expected to stop. luxorphoto/Shutterstock

To stop domestic violence, we need to change perpetrators’ behaviour

Thousands of Australian men are sitting on waiting lists every year to get help to end their violent behaviour – even though behaviour change programs can reduce their likelihood of offending again.

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