Articles on Collections

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Preliminary drawing of title page for ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ (New York: Harper & Row, 1963), 26:7, The Maurice Sendak Collection. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Library. © The Maurice Sendak Foundation.

From ‘Wild Horses’ to ‘Wild Things,’ a window into Maurice Sendak’s creative process

The book took eight years from conception to publication. In the earliest dummy, the monsters that millions have grown to love actually started out as horses.
George Stinney, a 14-year old wrongfully executed for murder in 1944. M. Watt Espy Papers, University at Albany

The death penalty, an American tradition on the decline

The National Death Penalty Archive collects documents and paraphernalia behind the thousands of executions that have taken place on American soil.
A self-portrait of George Platt Lynes from 1952. Gelatin silver print, 7-5/8 × 9 in. From the Collections of the Kinsey Institute, Indiana University. © Estate of George Platt Lynes.

The forgotten legacy of gay photographer George Platt Lynes

Lynes was a highly sought-after commercial and fashion photographer in the 1930s and 1940s. But he had to keep his most important body of work hidden away.
Record companies released stereo demonstration albums that showcased how sound could move from left to right, creating a sense of movement. From the collection of Janet Borgerson and Jonathan Schroeder

How stereo was first sold to a skeptical public

Sixty years ago, stereo promised to forever change the way people listened to music. But how could record companies convince customers to buy a new record player, speakers and amplifier?
Twenty-nine-year-old Rep.-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest woman to be elected to Congress, talks with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Criticism of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s clothes echoes attacks against early female labor activists

Striking 20th-century garment workers wore their best dresses and hats to send a message that they had the right to be taken seriously and have their voices heard.
For centuries, Pulter’s manuscript lay untouched at the University of Leeds’ Brotherton Library. University of Leeds Library, Brotherton Collection, MS Lt q 32

In the 1600s Hester Pulter wondered, ‘Why must I forever be confined?’ – now her poems are online for all to see

In a time when women were expected to be silent, no topic was off limits for Pulter, who penned verses about politics, science and loss. Her manuscript was just published in a free digital archive.
In the 1960s, the Temple established nine residential care facilities for the elderly and six homes for foster children in the Redwood Valley. Peoples Temple / Jonestown Gallery/flickr

Before the tragedy at Jonestown, the people of Peoples Temple had a dream

Throughout the movement's history, African Americans and whites lived, worked and protested side-by-side. It was one of the few long-term experiments in American interracial communalism.
When The Village Voice shut down in August, the city’s protest movements lost one of their biggest champions. Nick Lehr/The Conversation

The Village Voice’s photographers captured change, turmoil unfolding on New York City’s streets

For decades, the alternative weekly's photographers served as the eyes of the streets, working with activists to document and publicize the anguish and rage of everyday New Yorkers.
With a lot not on display, museums may not even know all that’s in their vast holdings. AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

Digitizing the vast ‘dark data’ in museum fossil collections

A tiny percentage of museums’ natural history holdings are on display. Very little of these vast archives is digitized and available online. But museums are working to change that.

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