Articles on Media

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Perhaps readers want less on what Trump is saying and more on what his administration is doing. CHRISTIAN HARTMANN / POOL/EPA

Media Files: Covering Trump, funding news and the rise of impunity. The Guardian’s Kath Viner on the big media stories of 2018

The biggest issues of 2018, with The Guardian’s editor-in-chief Katharine Viner. The Conversation, CC BY58.6 MB (download)
In conversation with Andrew Dodd, Andrea Carson and Matthew Ricketson, The Guardian's editor-in-chief discusses the big stories of 2018 and what she sees as the major challenges of 2019.
For many respondents, leaving a newsroom has allowed a re-evaluation of work-life balance. Mal Fairclough/AAP

New research reveals how Australian journalists are faring four years after redundancy

Since leaving secure jobs in newsrooms, employment has been unstable for many former journalists – but job satisfaction has been surprisingly high.
The Guelph Mercury office in Guelph, Ont., is seen in January 2016 after the final print edition of the newspaper was published. Ottawa has announced initiatives to support local journalism, including a measure to classify nonprofit news organizations as charities, making it easier for them to attract donations. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Hannah Yoon

Nonprofit news: Lessons from south of the border

Canada has a lot to learn from the U.S. about nonprofit news. Here's how nonprofit news organizations work in the United States. Spoiler alert: It's all about collaboration.
Québec Premier Francois Legault, left, exchanges hockey jerseys with Ontario Premier Doug Ford at Queens Park, in Toronto on Nov. 19, 2018. Ford’s recent cuts to francophone services in Ontario haven’t spawned nearly the media outrage that Québec language moves have. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)

The English-Canadian media’s selective outrage on bilingualism

To read English-Canadian media, you would think that Québec’s anglophones are under greater threat than the rest of the country's minority language communities. Why the selective outrage?
A gargoyle, or grotesque, looks over Paris from the bell tower of Notre Dame. ChiccoDodiFC/Shutterstock

Dealing with the daily media dose of the grotesque

With internet platforms and social media increase our access to direct, unedited and unfiltered media coverage. This has been used to great effect to deliberately distort our understanding of events.
The Canadian government wants to offer financial assistance to the news industry. How will it define what’s journalism? . THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Funding journalism means defining who’s a journalist – not a bad thing

The Canadian government has announced a new policy of providing financial assistance to the country's news industry. With any financial support will come a need to define who exactly is a journalist.
Journalists who cover illegal operations like logging at this site in northern Sagaing division, Myanmar, can face threats and violence. AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe

Why covering the environment is one of the most dangerous beats in journalism

Reporters who cover environment and natural resource issues are commonly threatened and harassed around the world. Some have been killed for coverage that threatens powerful interests.
A photograph by Oliver de Ros presents a different impression of the migrants at the Guatemalan border than the standard tropes published. Migrants bound for the U.S.-Mexico border wait on a bridge that stretches over the Suchiate River, connecting Guatemala and Mexico, Friday, Oct. 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Oliver de Ros)

Visual tropes of migration tell predictable but misleading stories

Photographs can influence us -- they can inspire us to act and they can also impact the way we think about issues. The recent published photos about the migrant 'caravan' convey several stereotypes.
Social media misinformation rose significantly before the 2016 presidential election. Georgejmclittle/shutterstock.com

Unlike in 2016, there was no spike in misinformation this election cycle

The Iffy Quotient measured misinformation on social media in the run-up to the recent elections. Facebook has gotten better at combating untrustworthy links, but Twitter still struggles.
The TV drama SeaChange had a huge public impact, which made the town where it was filmed, Barwon Heads on Victoria’s Bellarine Peninsula, a highly desirable destination. Diana Plater/AAP

Imagining your own SeaChange – how media inspire our great escapes

We read about and watch other people moving to the coast or country and, in doing so, sometimes we're persuaded to join the seachangers and treechangers ourselves.
A pop-up newsroom debunking facts and proposing real time fact-checking can change how media publish stories during specific events such as elections. stefan stefancik/Unsplash

A pop-up newsroom to fight fake news: a view from Swedish elections

Monitoring the spread of mis-information and dis-information during the Swedish national elections by a group of scholars and journalist could set a precedent elsewhere.
Britain’s opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn – accused of antisemitism – addresses the crowd in Trafalgar Square during protests against the UK visit of US President Donald Trump, July 13, 2018. Niklas HALLEN / AFP

Debate: Jeremy Corbyn, antisemitism and the British media

Charging the leader of the UK Labour Party with antisemitism is a narrative that went mainstream – but it’s one that omits pertinent information and opposing views.

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