Articles on Primates

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The brain processes different facial features separately, so how does it tie them together? Shutterstock

How our modular brain pieces the world together

Different parts of our brains process different things, like the facial features, voices and the gait of people we know. But it takes memory to weave them all together into a single picture.
Yuttasak Jannarong / shutterstock

Have humans always gone to war?

Archaeological remains, traditional tribes and conflict among chimpanzees can tell us much about the history of human warfare.
An orang-utan playing with the interactive digital projector at the Melbourne Zoo. Microsoft Research Centre for Social Natural User Interfaces at the University of Melbourne

Orang-utans play video games too, and it can enrich their lives in the zoo

An experiment providing interactive games for orang-utans is showing the potential for digital technology to enrich the lives of zoo animals.
The NHMRC code on animal use requires researchers to minimise harm, pain and distress but doesn’t provide guidance on how to do it. International Fund for Animal Welfare Animal Rescue Blog/Flickr

Australia failing to protect non-human primates in research

Draft guildelines for the use of non-human primates in research will dilute what protections these animals have, despite numerous reasons to stop the practice entirely.
The mantis shrimp has 12 types of visual cones. Klaus Stiefel/Flickr

Inside the colourful world of animal vision

As humans, we live in a colourful world, but differences in visual systems means that not all animals see the world in the same way. Unlike other aspects of an object such as size or mass, colour is not…
Orphan bonobos at a Congo sanctuary don’t understand how to comfort others or themselves as well as those reared by their mums. Flickr/Princess Stand in the Rain

For primates, having a mother helps them learn social skills

Wild bonobos, like all Great Apes, spend long childhoods with their mothers, learning the skills they need to function as socially and emotionally stable members of their community. But orphaned bonobos…
Our ape relatives respond like human toddlers who are denied a treat or feel frightened. Reflexiste

Do chimps and bonobos go ape when risk goes wrong?

Do chimpanzees and bonobos throw tantrums when their decision-making fails to pay off? That’s the question posed in a new PLoS ONE study by Brian Hare of Duke University and Alexandra Rosati of Yale. It…

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