Articles on Weather

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The Bureau of Meteorology’s tropical cyclone outlook is out today. AAP Image/Bureau of Meteorology, Japan Meteorological Agency

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: Cyclone season approacheth, but this year there’s a twist

Cyclone season approacheth, but this year there’s a twist. The Conversation, CC BY31.4 MB (download)
Australia must come to terms with some fundamental shifts in our weather patterns. This month, Andrew Watkins from the BOM and climate scientist Joelle Gergis explore what's in store.
Floodwaters surround farm equipment in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence near Trenton, N.C., on Sept. 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Trump’s ‘all-out effort’ on climate is derelict and risky

Donald Trump claims his administration has carried out an "all-out effort" in preparing for the effects of climate change. Nothing could be further from the truth.
Icy hailstones can do major damage, depending where they land. AP Photo/Nati Harnik

Destructive 2018 hail season a sign of things to come

The future climate that scientists predict for the middle of the United States is one that will foster more hail events with bigger hailstones.
Sometimes air goes up past the condensation level then falls back below the condensation level, then up, then below, again and again. This creates clouds that are stripy, often with lines between the clouds. Robert Lawry/Author provided

Curious Kids: where do clouds come from and why do they have different shapes?

Clouds formed by rising warm air currents are called 'convection clouds'. Because of all the rising air coming up, these clouds can be bumpy on top, sometimes looking like cotton wool or cauliflower.
Hurricane Florence, as seen over the Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 9. NOAA NWS National Hurricane Center/Handout via REUTERS

How meteorologists predict the next big hurricane

How do experts know when and where the next big hurricane is going to hit? A look at the complicated science of forecasting.
Folklore says we might be able to predict the coming of rain by observing the behaviour of ants. from www.shutterstock.com

We’ve got apps and radars – but can ants predict rain?

Ants have many tricks to deal with rain – like holding their breath, blocking nest entrances or drinking excess water and releasing it elsewhere by 'communal peeing.' But can they see rain coming?
Your nose knows what’s on the way. Lucy Chian/Unsplash

Why you can smell rain

A weather expert explains where petrichor – that pleasant, earthy scent that accompanies a storm's first raindrops – comes from.
The sun sets behind the Statue of Liberty, July 1, 2018. AP Photo/Andres Kudacki, File

Coping with heat waves: 5 essential reads

July is the hottest month in much of North America. Experts explain who is most affected by heat waves and ways to cope with them.
One one thousand, two one thousand…. Eric Ward/Unsplash

How far away was that lightning?

When you see a bolt of lightning, do you immediately start counting to see how far off a storm is? An atmospheric scientist parses the practice.

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