Articles on Radio astronomy

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Jets generated by supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies can transport huge amounts of energy across great distances. REUTERS/X-ray: NASA/CXC/Tokyo Institute of Technology/J.Kataoka et al

Radio galaxies: the mysterious, secretive “beasts” of the Universe

It's difficult to get jets - powerful, lightning fast particles - to give up their secrets. The new Square Kilometre Array radio telescope could hold the key to solving jets' mysteries.
The new discovery: The C-shaped “wide angle tail galaxy” (pink) surrounded by the galaxies of the Matorny-Terentev cluster (white). Julie Banfield

How citizen scientists discovered a giant cluster of galaxies

The find by citizen scientists of at least 40 galaxies in a cluster more than a billion light years away is the astronomical equivalent of finding a needle in a haystack.
Artist’s impressiong of the Square Kilometre Array, which will revolutionise our ability to detect fast radio bursts. SKA Project Development Office and Swinburne Astronomy Productions - Swinburne Astronomy Productions for SKA Project Development Office

Message from aliens or colliding objects? The hunt for enigmatic radio bursts is about to get real

A technological revolution in astronomical observations could be the key to understanding the perplexing phenonenon known as 'fast radio bursts' from outer space.
The vast expanse of Western Australia is perfect for radio astronomy. Pete Wheeler, ICRAR

Tuning in to cosmic radio from the dawn of time

The Murchison Widefield Array sits in remote Western Australia far from noisy civilisation so it can help us understand the universe by tuning into radio waves from the distant cosmos.
The Dreamtime constellation of The Emu rises out of the glow of Sydney, 350km away from the Australian Astronomical Observatory. David Malin

Darkness is disappearing and that’s bad news for astronomy

Darkness is precious to astronomers, but it's also good for everybody. We should ensure we preserve the dark by using the latest technologies responsibly.
The 64-metre Parkes Radio telescope will be instrumental in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. CSIRO/David McClenaghan

The hunt for ET will boost Australian astronomy

The Parkes radio telescope is part of the US$100 million search for life elsewhere in the universe, but the investment will also benefit other space research at The Dish.
Scientists knew the mystery signals were close by the Parkes radio telescope: but what was the source? Flickr/Amanda Slater

How we found the source of the mystery signals at The Dish

Astronomers used to probing the universe always knew that strange signals detected by the Parkes radio telescope were coming from somewhere closer to home. But finding the source was the tricky bit.
A fast radio burst was detected live at Parkes in May 2014. Flickr/Wayne England

A faster response needed to see Fast Radio Bursts in the universe

Astronomers are trying to improve their hunt for rapid bursts of radio emission in the universe called Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) so they can better observe these mysterious events, which are thought to…

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