Articles on Science

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Michael Shannon and Michael Stuhlbarg in the film “The Shape of Water.” (Kerry Hayes /Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation All Rights Reserved)

TIFF 2017: Movie magic from math and science

This year's Toronto International Film Festival is a further example of how science, technology, engineering and math illuminate movies – and, in the process, our minds.
Women are less likely to be published in scientific journals. Shutterstock

Women scientists lag in academic publishing, and it matters

Women can often draw attention to dimensions of thinking that their male perspective may miss. But this will only work if they are in positions that allow them to lead and drive the research agenda.
Nature gave us ten fingers, so it makes sense to count to ten. But what happens when we run out of fingers? Flickr/Bethan

Curious Kids: Why do we count to 10?

Why are there 60 minutes in an hour, and not 10? Why do we count up to 10, anyway? Quentin, age five, wants to know.
Tiny hairs cover the bodies of honeybees — including this one dusted in pollen — that allow them to detect molecular “fingerprints” similar to how home security sensors work. (Shutterstock)

How home security resembles dancing honeybees

Bees and home security cameras use the same complex techniques to monitor their environments.
People reject science such as that about climate change and vaccines, but readily believe scientists about solar eclipses, like this one reflected on the sunglasses of a man dangerously watching in Nicosia, Cyprus, in a 2015 file photo. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

Eclipse of reason: Why do people disbelieve scientists?

People universally believe scientists' solar eclipse calendars, but vaccine warnings or climate predictions are forms of science that strangely do not enjoy equivalent acceptance.
The manuscript of ‘Memoirs of Sir Isaac Newton’ shows the words ‘does this apple fall?’ Newton’s curiosity about the falling piece of fruit helped him develop the theory of gravity. (AP Photo/Lucy Young)

No new Einsteins to emerge if science funding snubs curiosity

Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein would have bridled under today's research funding bureaucracy. It's time to allow scientists to indulge their curiosity again.
Male scientists dominate labs, often with little to no female representation in the work or research subjects. Shutterstock

Sex matters: Male bias in the lab is bad science

Research laboratories are dominated by men, and that's not only bad for lab culture, it can be dangerous for science.
Earth, shot from space, as it absorbs and reflects rays of light coming from the Sun - the same white-looking rays that give our sky its colour. NASA

Curious Kids: Why is the sky blue and where does it start?

Some people think the sky is blue because of sunlight reflected off the ocean and back into the sky. But that's not the real reason.
Nearly one-third of tropical animal species face extinction if humans do not curb our growing appetites for beef, pork and other land-intensive meats. The Panamanian golden frog bred by the Vancouver Aquarium in this 2014 file photo may be extinct in its natural habitat. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

How changing your diet could save animals from extinction

As much as one-third of animal species in the tropics could be eradicated if their habitats continue to be converted for monoculture farming. We can all do something to make a difference.
Tabatha Bundesen’s pet Tardar Sauce became an Internet sensation known as “Grumpy Cat” for a resting facial appearance that resembles a look of dissatisfaction. Now, scientists are starting to be able to read animal emotions from their expressions. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

Animal emotions stare us in the face — are our pets happy?

Scientists are beginning to link animal facial expressions to emotions, making it possible for us to understand how they feel.
Future food will shift to alternative proteins such as insects, like this 3D-printed biscuit made of insect flour by designer Penelope Kupfer. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Bugging out: How we’ll feed ourselves in 2167

Climate change, insects and urban farm towers are a few things that will change how and what we eat in the future.

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