Articles on Science

Displaying 1 - 20 of 156 articles

Tiny hairs cover the bodies of honeybees — including this one dusted in pollen — that allow them to detect molecular “fingerprints” similar to how home security sensors work. (Shutterstock)

How home security resembles dancing honeybees

Bees and home security cameras use the same complex techniques to monitor their environments.
People reject science such as that about climate change and vaccines, but readily believe scientists about solar eclipses, like this one reflected on the sunglasses of a man dangerously watching in Nicosia, Cyprus, in a 2015 file photo. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

Eclipse of reason: Why do people disbelieve scientists?

People universally believe scientists' solar eclipse calendars, but vaccine warnings or climate predictions are forms of science that strangely do not enjoy equivalent acceptance.
The manuscript of ‘Memoirs of Sir Isaac Newton’ shows the words ‘does this apple fall?’ Newton’s curiosity about the falling piece of fruit helped him develop the theory of gravity. (AP Photo/Lucy Young)

No new Einsteins to emerge if science funding snubs curiosity

Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein would have bridled under today's research funding bureaucracy. It's time to allow scientists to indulge their curiosity again.
Male scientists dominate labs, often with little to no female representation in the work or research subjects. Shutterstock

Sex matters: Male bias in the lab is bad science

Research laboratories are dominated by men, and that's not only bad for lab culture, it can be dangerous for science.
Earth, shot from space, as it absorbs and reflects rays of light coming from the Sun - the same white-looking rays that give our sky its colour. NASA

Curious Kids: Why is the sky blue and where does it start?

Some people think the sky is blue because of sunlight reflected off the ocean and back into the sky. But that's not the real reason.
President Donald Trump announcing the US’s withdrawal from the Paris Climate Agreement. Reuters/Kevin Lamarque

Book review: how the merchants of doubt undermine science

A book published seven years ago on the role of lobbyists fighting to discredit science has once again become highly relevant.
Nearly one-third of tropical animal species face extinction if humans do not curb our growing appetites for beef, pork and other land-intensive meats. The Panamanian golden frog bred by the Vancouver Aquarium in this 2014 file photo may be extinct in its natural habitat. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

How changing your diet could save animals from extinction

As much as one-third of animal species in the tropics could be eradicated if their habitats continue to be converted for monoculture farming. We can all do something to make a difference.
Tabatha Bundesen’s pet Tardar Sauce became an Internet sensation known as “Grumpy Cat” for a resting facial appearance that resembles a look of dissatisfaction. Now, scientists are starting to be able to read animal emotions from their expressions. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

Animal emotions stare us in the face — are our pets happy?

Scientists are beginning to link animal facial expressions to emotions, making it possible for us to understand how they feel.
Future food will shift to alternative proteins such as insects, like this 3D-printed biscuit made of insect flour by designer Penelope Kupfer. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Bugging out: How we’ll feed ourselves in 2167

Climate change, insects and urban farm towers are a few things that will change how and what we eat in the future.
Canada in 2167 could see genetically engineered humans living alongside sentient machines in cities radically altered by ecological change. (Shutterstock)

Humans in 2167: Internet implants and no sleep

By 2167, genetically designed, digitally enhanced humans with Internet-connected brains will live with intelligent machines in a transformed environment and maybe even among the stars.
Using passive eDNA detection, we won’t have to wait until we see massive algae blooms to know lakes are struggling.

DNA barcodes — sci-fi tech to safeguard environment

By 2167, DNA barcoding scans will lead to weather-style "biodiversity forecasts," enabling us to more easily protect and care for the environment.
Once the coat around the seed is moistened, the embryo cells expand and burst out in a process called germination. shutterstock/NUM LPPHOTO

Curious Kids: how can a tiny seed actually grow into a huge tree?

A seed contains nearly everything a tree needs to get growing. Just add a dash of water, a bit of warmth and the right location, and you'll be seeing green in no time.

Top contributors

More