Articles sur APRA

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At least ten cents in every dollar of superannuation assets is indirectly financing house purchases via commercial bank debt. AAP/Lukas Coch

Here’s how superannuation is already financing homes

What critics of the plan to use superannuation for housing miss is that Australia’s super system already channels a significant proportion of retirement savings into housing.
APRA and its chairman Wayne Bryes may be more prescriptive on lending rules in an attempt to curb rising house prices. Mich Tsikas/AAP

The APRA bandaid for the housing market is wearing off

The government's unwillingness to consider changing the tax system to fix housing affordability makes it more likely that APRA may have to become even more prescriptive with its lending criteria.
Australian banks’ capital levels must be ‘unquestionably strong’, according to the Financial Systems Inquiry. AAP/Dean Lewins

APRA fiddles on bank risk while Rome burns

Some argue, determinedly and erroneously, that when functioning correctly bank capital levels are almost magical things.
Mortgage tracker rates follow the cash rate. www.shutterstock.com

Business Briefing: rate tracker mortgages

Business Briefing: rate tracker mortgages. The Conversation16 Mo (download)
Rate tracker mortgages could provide some certainty for customers and increase trust in the banking sector.
The Australian Prudential Regulation should be put up for a capability review. Mick Tsikas/AAP

APRA take the easy road out with risk culture

Just when we all thought that the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) had already won the race to be most ineffective regulator of the year, up pops the Australian Prudential Regulation…
NAB CEO Andrew Thorburn defended the culture of the bank he works for during the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Economics annual public hearing. Lukas Coch/AAP

Big four bank chiefs face parliamentary committee: experts react

As the chief executives of Australia's big four banks come before a House of Representatives economics committee, we ask a panel of experts what questions the banks should be answering.
Just like the characters of The Big Short, its time to pick up the warning signs of a global financial crisis. Paramount Pictures

Shadow banking increases the risk of another global financial crisis

The financial products offered by the shadow banking sector allow investors to be further removed from their investments and banks to escape regulation, increasing the risk in the sector overall.
Westpac Chief Executive Officer Brian Hartzer gave excuses for traders behaviour in regards to the BBSW benchmark. David Moir/AAP

Banking excuses wearing a bit thin

With all the weight of evidence stacked against the banks in the case of BBSW benchmark, surely now is the time for the government to enforce regulation.

Banking regulation – descent into farce

It may be the effect of the election but the regulation of banking in Australia appears to be descending into farce. Just last week, maybe in anticipation of adverse events to come, the Australian Financial…
It’s stormy conditions in share markets and a competitive sector, not natural disasters, that will define the outlook for the insurance sector. KARIN CALVERT/AAP

Insurance outlook: in an era of increasing competition technology will make the difference

The outlook for the insurance sector will depend less on natural disasters and more on how the big insurers respond to smaller competitors and the use of technology in assessing policies.
Large Australian banks are being required to significantly increase their levels of equity capital. Image sourced from www.shutterstock.com

Explainer: banks are raising capital, but should we be worried?

Investors may not like it but Australian banks have been given little choice by the prudential regulator other than to undertake capital raisings.

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