Articles sur Clive Palmer

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Clive Palmer didn’t win any seats for his party in the election, but he says his massive advertising spend was “worth it” to prevent Bill Shorten from becoming prime minister. Darren England/AAP

After Clive Palmer’s $60 million campaign, limits on political advertising are more important than ever

Australia needs to rein in the ever-increasing role of private money in federal elections with caps on political advertising and donations.
The leaders debate returned Western Australia to the political spotlight this week. Wes Mountain/The Conversation, CC BY-ND

State of the states: more preference deals as pre-polling begins

Pre-poll votes within the first 24 hours were almost double the number at the same stage in 2016. That could hurt some minor parties who traditionally spend big in the last few weeks of a campaign.
While Clive Palmer is often lumped in with other right-wingers, in fact he espouses a range of populist ideas and is quite progressive on some issues. AAP/Kelly Barnes

Now for the $55 million question: what does Clive Palmer actually want?

He's spending big and may well win a spot in the Senate. But the big question is what the billionaire businessman intends to do if he returns to the Australian parliament.
Political advertising has moved away from traditional media and is now more prevalent on platforms like Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram. AAP/ALP/Liberal Party/GetUp!/Australian Youth Climate Coalition

Facebook videos, targeted texts and Clive Palmer memes: how digital advertising is shaping this election campaign

The major parties are focusing on social media like never before to get their messaging out – and finding more creative ways to do it.
Clive Palmer’s United Australia Party, Pauline Hanson’s One Nation, and Fraser Anning’s new Conservative National Party will compete for the conservative vote. AAP/The Conversation

How much influence will independents and minor parties have this election? Please explain

Voter dissatisfaction with the major parties means minor party preferences are likely to play a critical role in many seats, making the election outcome hard to predict.
Leader of the United Australia Party Clive Palmer address the media during a press conference in Townsville, April 18. Michael Chambers/AAP

View from The Hill: Palmer flypaper sticky for both sides

Apart from the debate about debates, Friday’s campaign argy bargy centred on the Liberals’ preference deal with Clive Palmer’s United Australia Party, due to be announced by Palmer on Monday.
The Coalition is expected to announce a preference deal with Clive Palmer’s United Australia Party on Monday. Wes Mountain/The Conversation, CC BY-ND

State of the states: Palmer’s preference deal and watergate woes

Clive Palmer was in the news this week after the Newspoll that showed that his United Australia Party could change the result in marginal seats in several states.
Glenn Lazarus and former MP Pauline Hanson are competing for every PUP vote to win a Queensland Senate seat. Mick Tsikas/Dan Peled/AAP

700,000 Palmer United Party votes up for grabs: who’ll win them this time?

One in 20 Australians voted for the Palmer United Party in 2013. Their votes will be crucial again – especially in Queensland, where ex-PUP senator Glenn Lazarus could be replaced by Pauline Hanson.
Malcolm Turnbull receives a lick during a visit to the Port of Eden on the NSW south coast on Monday. Lukas Coch/AAP

The Liberals may have miscalculated Turnbull’s electoral appeal

Finally, Clive Palmer has formally put a full stop to his personal political career, announcing on Monday he won’t be running for the Senate. Palmer United Party (PUP) will still field Senate candidates…

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