Articles sur disasters

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A man tries to get his dog out of a flooded neighbourhood in Lumberton, N.C., in September 2018 in the aftermath of hurricane Florence. Many people opted to ignore evacuation warnings, suggesting a distrust of authorities. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

Developing trust after disasters – and every day

A peaceful society requires us to trust our public institutions, but in order to do so, we must question them. Questions are a healthy and necessary response to a world filled with uncertainty.
Loading new furniture donated to Hurricane Irma survivors in Chokoloskee, Fla.

Sending help where it’s needed most after disasters

The billions of dollars worth of aid dispatched every year to alleviate the suffering and damage after earthquakes and hurricanes would do more good if it didn't get clumped up.
Hurricane Harvey approaching the Texas Gulf Coast in August 2017. NOAA/Handout via Reuters

3 reasons why the US is vulnerable to big disasters

Large-scale emergencies can be a strain, even in one of the world's richest countries. Population growth, income inequality and fragile supply chains may make the problem worse.
A hand touches the monument that honours the 26 coal miners who perished in the Westray mine disaster at the Westray Miners Memorial Park in New Glasgow, N.S. On the 26th anniversary of the disaster, are we doing enough to ensure those responsible for such disasters are accountable? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

The importance of accountability after deadly disasters

This week marks the 26th anniversary of the Westray mine disaster in Nova Scotia. There have been plenty of disasters since then but we still struggle to hold people to account when systems fail.
A man places a placard before a vigil remembering the victims of a deadly van attack at Mel Lastman Square in Toronto on April 29, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

How Toronto is recovering from the van attack

Toronto is grappling with a new normal a week after a heinous van attack killed 10 people and left many injured. Here's how cities recover from disasters, both emotionally and physically.
The epicenter of Mexico’s lethal September 2017 earthquake was less than 65 miles outside the nation’s capital. Nacho Doce/Reuters

Mexico City’s potent 2017 earthquake was a rare ‘bending’ quake – and it could happen again

Not all earthquakes are made equal. A study on the Sept. 2017 quake that killed 300 in Mexico City found that both its location and cause were unusual.
The Venezuelans now rushing across the border to seek refuge in Brazil join millions of Brazilian migrants who’ve been displaced within their own country. Nacho Doce/Reuters

Venezuelan refugees inflame Brazil’s already simmering migrant crisis

Since 2000, 8.8 million Brazilians have been displaced by disaster, development and crime, new data shows. Now Venezuelan migrants are pouring into the country. Still, Brazil has no real refugee plan.
A Westpac Little Ripper drone helped rescue two teens off the coast of Australia by dropping a flotation device to them. Westpac Little Ripper

Robots to the rescue: Saving lives with unmanned vehicles

Drones and unmanned aerial vehicles are already saving lives in search and rescue operations, but they still need improvements if they're to be widely used in the most dangerous situations.
While California’s shocking and deadly wildfires are a tragedy making headlines, future crises lurk beneath the surface elsewhere. Gene Blevins/Reuters

To prevent the next global crisis, don’t forget today’s small disasters

From California's fires to the Rohingya, headlines can be overwhelming these days. But that doesn't mean we should neglect so-called 'silent crises,' which can quickly erupt into global disasters.
Mass evacuations in response to natural disasters like Hurricane Maria are a logistical challenge, but also face psychological barriers to residents being willing and able to leave. EPA

Psychology holds key to getting people out before disaster strikes

Promoting individual resilience will contribute to reductions in disaster threats for at-risk communities globally.
A satellite image of Hurricane Irma spiraling through the Caribbean. NOAA/AP

In the Caribbean, colonialism and inequality mean hurricanes hit harder

The Caribbean is facing its second deadly hurricane in as many weeks. This isn't just bad luck: the region's extreme vulnerability to disaster also reflects entrenched social inequalities.

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