Articles sur First Amendment

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The Supreme Court ruled that baker Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop, could refuse to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple because of his religious beliefs. AP/David Zalubowski)

Christianity at the Supreme Court: From majority power to minority rights

There's been a reversal of power between religious and secular sides of American culture. The Supreme Court is now at the center of that shift.
Union Square: contentious political rallies helped progressive social reformers argue for the protection of freedom of speech and freedom of assembly. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington DC, USA

How New York’s Union Square helped shape free speech in the US

New York's Union Square is an important site in American labor history. One scholar's research illustrates the shifting meanings and inherent tensions of public space as an epicenter of civic life.
Australian federal police entering the Australian Broadcast Company headquarters on June 5, 2019. A.B.C. screenshot from videotape

Investigating the investigative reporters: Bad news from Down Under

An American media scholar studying in Australia looks at the protections offered by the two countries for investigative reporting, raising crucial questions about journalism's role in democracy.
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange leaves Southwark Crown Court in London, May 1, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

Assange’s new indictment: Espionage and the First Amendment

Julian Assange's indictment under the Espionage Act, a sweeping law with heavy penalties for unauthorized receiving or disclosing of classified information, poses a threat to press freedom.
Julian Assange goes back to court in London on May 2. Reuters/Hannah Mckay

Is the Assange indictment a threat to the First Amendment?

The US indicted WikiLeaks co-founder Julian Assange for conspiring to hack into a government computer. But the prosecution of Assange may also pose a risk to the rights of journalists in the US.
Kristinn Hrafnsson, editor in chief of WikiLeaks, and barrister Jennifer Robinson talk to the media after Julian Assange’s arrest in London. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

Journalism’s Assange problem

It's dangerous for the press to take up Julian Assange's cause, two journalism scholars write. Assange is no journalist, they say, and making him out to be one is likely to damage press freedoms.
The Constitution is interpreted differently by the alt-right. Shutterstock/Joseph Sohm

How the alt-right corrupts the Constitution

The growing number of self-taught, right-wing experts on the Constitution believe not only in the rights of white people, but have a comprehensive – if not comprehensible – view of the Constitution.
Presidents Thomas Jefferson and Donald Trump. Wikipedia for Jefferson official portrait/REUTERS/Leah Millis for Trump photo

What Thomas Jefferson, Donald Trump and the American people think about freedom of the press

Americans are overwhelmingly committed to a free press and hostile to government restrictions, a new poll finds. But the country is divided on the meaning of President Trump's attacks on the press.
CNN White House correspondent Kaitlan Collins in front of the White House. AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Can Trump’s White House legally ban reporters?

The Trump administration's hostility toward journalists is raising new questions about what rights journalists have to access government officials and events.
Alex Jones speaks during a rally for candidate Donald Trump near the Republican National Convention in July 2016. Reuters/Lucas Jackson

Audiences love the anger: Alex Jones, or someone like him, will be back

Confrontational characters spouting conspiracy theories and fringe ideas have been around since American broadcasting began. With Alex Jones banished from the web, someone else will take his place.
Plaintiff Mark Janus, right, leaves the the Supreme Court Wednesday. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Janus decision extends First Amendment ‘right of silence’

The Supreme Court's Janus ruling extends strong protection to the First Amendment 'right of silence' and continues their trend of expanding First Amendment rights, often at the behest of conservatives.
Funeral services took place for Benjamin Andrew Wheeler, one of the students killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, while a hearse with another shooting victim drives by. AP Photo/Julio Cortez

Falsehoods, Sandy Hook and suing Alex Jones

Family members of Sandy Hook victims sued media personality Alex Jones over his claims that the killings were a hoax they participated in. Current law makes their lawsuit unnecessarily hard to prove.
The justices have previously ruled that the government cannot compel people to speak its message or associate with ideas they do not hold. www.shutterstock.com

Supreme Court to rule on your First Amendment right to silence

Most people know that the First Amendment protects free speech. But two upcoming Supreme Court cases reveal how it also gives people in the US the right not to speak.

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