Articles sur Materials science

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Molecular machines are ready to join forces and take on real-world work. Chenfeng Ke

3-D printing turns nanomachines into life-size workers

Research on molecular machines won last year's Nobel Prize in chemistry. Now scientists have figured out a way to get these tiny molecules to join forces and collaborate on real work on a macro scale.
Achievement unlocked: Rewritable paper. Yadong Yin

Reprintable paper becomes a reality

Coating paper with an inexpensive thin film can allow users to print and erase a physical page as many as 80 times. That reduces both the cost and the environmental effects of paper use.
Gotcha, five times faster than the blink of an eye. Candler Hobbs/Georgia Tech

The frog tongue is a high-speed adhesive

How do a frog's tongue and saliva work together to be sticky enough to lift 1.4 times the animal's body weight? Painstaking lab work found their spit switches between two distinct phases to nab prey.
The new One World Trade Center building, made with high-performance concrete. John D. Morris

How building design changed after 9/11

Tragedies involving building collapses prompt structural engineers to figure out what happened, and how to prevent it from recurring.
Hydrogen fueling stations like this could become more common if materials scientists and other researchers keep pushing for new breakthroughs. fueling station photo via shutterstock.com

Finding better ways to get hydrogen fuel from water

Modifying chemicals' molecular properties can make 'splitting' hydrogen from water more efficient.
Nano-architects design materials that can work together at very tiny scales, like these interlocking gears made of carbon tubes and benzene molecules. NASA

Molecular architects: how scientists design new materials

One of the great technological challenges of this century is to design novel items and then make them – and have the results match the intent.
A molecular beam epitaxy machine used to create semiconductor samples. John C. Bean (University of Virginia) and Tom Vandervelde (Tufts University)

Beyond silicon: the search for new semiconductors

As we reach the limits of what can be done with silicon, the search for new and improved superconductors is on.

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