Articles sur Medical ethics

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Controversial gene editing should not proceed without citizen input and societal consensus. (Shutterstock)

Human genome editing: We should all have a say

A team in the U.S. is said to have safely and effectively altered human embryos. The news is a reminder that citizens must be consulted on developments potentially affecting the future of the species.
Assisted dying legislation is likely to be introduced in Victorian Parliament within a month, and be based on a report launched today by Brian Owler and Jill Hennessy. JOE CASTRO/AAP

Victoria may soon have assisted dying laws for terminally ill patients

Public opinion, shifting views in the health profession and international trends allowing assisted dying mean it will be lawful in Australia at some point. But will it be lawful in Victoria soon?
A subject plays a computer game as part of a neural security experiment at the University of Washington. Patrick Bennett

Helping or hacking? Engineers and ethicists must work together on brain-computer interface technology

BCI devices that read minds and act on intentions can change lives for the better. But they could also be put to nefarious use in the not-too-distant future. Now's the time to think about risks.
Information doctors find out about you online may affect your treatment. But not all of it is accurate or relevant. from www.shutterstock.com

Yes, your doctor might Google you

When we think about Google and health, we usually think about patients searching online for health information. But you may be surprised to hear that doctors Google you.
Cryonics has gone from the world of sci-fi movies to the law courts for the family of one 14-year-old girl. from www.shutterstock.com

Cryonics: hype, hope or hell?

A UK court has allowed a 14-year-old girl's body to be frozen until doctors find a cure for the cancer that killed her. Is this latest example of cryogenics hope, hype or hell?
Parents’ role as medical decision-makers is sometimes questioned when they don’t choose the recommended treatment for their child. from shutterstock.com

When parents disagree with doctors on a child’s treatment, who should have the final say?

It is ethical for doctors to accept a treatment option parents want – providing it is good enough – rather than insisting on what they believe is the best possible treatment for the child.
Until 2013, laws in every Australian state and territory allowed people to be forced to have psychiatric treatment even if they competently refused it. from shutterstock.com

Should we be forcing people with severe mental illness to have treatment they don’t want?

Until 2013, Australian state and territory laws allowed forcing people into psychiatric treatment if it was thought necessary to protect them from serious harm – even if they competently refused it.
Bone-marrow transplants to treat leukaemia are one of the miniscule number of stem-cell treatments that have a strong evidence base. from shutterstock.com

What Australia needs to do to protect consumers from untested stem-cell treatments

Australians clinics are offering stem-cell-based anti-ageing and cosmetic therapies that have not been clinically tested. Here's what we need to do to ensure consumers don't get ripped off, or worse.
Will China be the first to genetically enhance future generations? Jianan Yu/Reuters

The future of genetic enhancement is not in the West

Regulations, funding and public opinion around genetically enhancing future generations vary from country to country. Here's why China may be poised to be the pioneer.
Kidneys for donation are in short supply, via Shutterstock. From www.shuttertock.com

Is it ethical to purchase human organs?

A shortage of organs for donation has led some to ask: would establishing a market help? That, however, raises another question: would it also harm?

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