Articles sur Serial killers

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A tribute to those lost from the community, people march with We Will Not Rest #UntilWe'reSafe t-shirts during Toronto Pride parade on June 24, 2018. Many feel the recent killings in Toronto might have received more attention had the victims not been homosexuals or racialized men. The Canadian Press/Cole Burston

Gay Village killings show there’s still tension between Toronto cops, LGBTQ community

The murder investigation of missing gay men in Toronto has raised questions of inequalities. A long view of police relationships with LGBTQ communities in Canada show that much progress has been made.
Break-and-enters are increasingly viewed as a precursor to sexually violent crimes. So why do police forces misclassify and mischaracterize them? (Shutterstock)

How police underestimate break-ins as gateway crimes for sex predators

Break-and-enters are consistently common among incarcerated sex offenders as their first, or gateway, offence. But police forces' statistical manipulation allows them to go entirely undetected.
Forensic anthropologist Prof. Kathy Gruspier (left) is seen with police officers at a Toronto property where alleged serial killer Bruce McArthur worked. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

How police are recovering the victims of the Toronto serial killer

Police in Toronto say they've found the remains of at least six people in the midst of their investigation into alleged serial killer Bruce McArthur. Here's what goes on in such investigations.
Serial killers are strategic and clever, usually choosing cities or towns in the midst of upheaval to commit their heinous crimes so they can fly under the radar. (Shutterstock)

How serial killers capitalize on chaos, according to an expert

As Toronto reacts to the news that a killer was preying on victims in the city’s gay village, an expert on serial killers explains how violent offenders are more strategic than previously thought.
Sometimes you don’t know whether to laugh or cry. 'Clowns' via www.shutterstock.com

The psychology behind why clowns creep us out

Random clown sightings don't make everyone laugh. A psychologist who has studied creepiness explains why clowns are especially adept at making us squirm.
Do only sociopaths hitch? Hitchhiker via www.shutterstock.com

Could the sharing economy bring back hitchhiking?

As our ever-increasing use of services like Uber, Lyft and AirBnB show, it's safe to trust other Americans. Time for hitchhking to make a comeback.

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