Articles sur Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

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A statue of John A. Macdonald in Montreal has been repeatedly vandalized with red paint to symbolize blood. As the debate continues about removing statues, what specific actions are needed to promote reconciliation? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Reconciliation requires more than symbolic gestures

Removing statues of historical figures may be important symbolic statements when it comes to reconciliation, but action on important Indigenous issues like land claims and education are needed more.
Four hikers walk west, from the village of Val Marie in southern Saskatchewan, along a historical trail once used by Indigenous tribes and settlers. Giving Canadians the ‘right to roam’ might be a small step toward answering the calls of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. James R. Page

Why Canadians need ‘the right to roam’

A right-to-roam movement has never developed in Canada the way it has in the U.K. Here's how it could benefit Canadian society as a whole, including reconciliation efforts with the Indigenous.
Bernie Williams, right, a women’s advocate in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, embraces Carmen Paterson while testifying at the final day of hearings at the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, in Richmond, B.C., on April 8, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

Can we really teach ‘Indigenizing’ courses online?

University "Indigenization" efforts using Massive Open Online Courses promise to reach wide audiences. They also raise critical questions about how to embody Indigenous ways of knowing and relating.
Colten Boushie’s uncle, Alvin Baptiste, and his brother Jace Boushie address demonstrators gathered outside of the courthouse in North Battleford, Sask.,on Feb.10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Matt Smith

‘Clearing the plains’ continues with the acquittal of Gerald Stanley

It's time for an overhaul of the justice system in Canada: How juries are selected, how Indigenous victims are treated and to challenge embedded racism within police forces and courts.
Dr. Cindy Blackstock, executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society, has called on the federal government to stop its chronic underfunding of services for Indigenous children. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Canada guilty of forging crisis in Indigenous foster care

No project for reconciliation can succeed unless the federal and provincial governments roll back their power and create space for Indigenous control over their own self-determining futures.
Bishop Desmond Tutu during South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission process. Reuters

Timol inquest opens new door to justice against apartheid atrocities

Inquests into atrocities committed under apartheid are important because many South Africans are beginning to question whether justice was done under the country's truth and reconciliation process.
Residential school survivor Lorna Standingready is comforted by a fellow survivor during the closing ceremony of the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

How I am learning to include Indigenous knowledge in the classroom

"What have we failed to know and at what cost?" An education professor draws upon Indigenous literature to support a personal journey into classroom decolonization.
Thousands of copper nails representing thousands of Indigenous children who died in Canada’s residential schools were hammered into the Reconciliation Pole before its raising at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, B.C., on April 1, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

This is why most teachers need Indigenous coaches

Many Canadian teachers worry about how to incorporate Indigenous content into the classroom. For one sociology professor, finding Indigenous mentorship was richly rewarding.
At the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Desmond Tutu promoted restorative justice. But focusing on individuals neglects broader contexts of violence and inequality. Reuters

Why a narrow view of restorative justice blunts its impact

If violent contexts aren't taken into account, restorative justice does not serve broader society. Instead it serves as a peacemaking process within a paradigm stacked against the poor and vulnerable.
The relationship between Canada’s Aboriginal peoples and non-indigenous population has never been an equal one. AAP Image/Adam Gartrell

Canada’s progress shows indigenous reconciliation is a long-term process

The relationship between Canada's Aboriginal peoples and non-indigenous population has never been an equal one, even though the 1982 national constitution recognises Aboriginal rights.

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