Articles on Dopamine

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Ozzy Osbourne and wife Sharon Osbourne after Ozzy received a Golden God Award at the Metal Hammer Golden Gods ceremony in London on June 11, 2018. Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP Photo

Ozzy Osbourne has a type of Parkinson’s disease called Parkin: A neurologist explains

Ozzy Osbourne, famous for biting heads off bats, heavy metal music and a reality TV show, announced he has Parkinson's disease. A Parkinson's specialist explains the disease and recent advances.
The average Canadian adult consumes more than triple the daily limit of 25g added sugar recommended by the World Health Organization. (Unsplash/muhammad ruqiyaddin)

Your brain on sugar: What the science actually says

Sugar triggers dopamine "hits" in the brain, making us crave more of it. Sugar also disrupts memory formation.
We knew people with Parkinson’s disease were at heightened risk of developing addictive behaviours like gambling. Our research gives insight into why this is. From shutterstock.com

Why do many people with Parkinson’s disease develop an addiction? We built a virtual casino to find out

About one in six people who take the most common medication for Parkinson's disease will develop addictive behaviours. We found whether this happens depends on a person's unique brain structure.
Cannabis seedlings are shown at the new Aurora Cannabis facility, November 24, 2017 in Montréal. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz)

Hope for cannabis as treatment for opioid addiction

Research shows that THC and CBD in cannabis have potential to interrupt the vicious cycle of opioid addiction, dependence, withdrawal and relapse.
Video games have inspired a revolution in university teaching. Pictured here is a scene from the popular game Fortnite Battle Royale. (Sergey Galyonkin, Epic Games Berlin via Wikimedia Commons)

How playful design is transforming university education

University course designers are harnessing the addictive quality of video games to develop 'Serious educational games' that engage and motivate students.
HIV becomes dormant in the body and can hide in brain cells. Joseph Lebowitz, Dr. Min Lin, and Dr. Habibeh Khoshboue

HIV lies dormant in brain, increasing risk of dementia, but how?

While drugs have been developed to treat HIV and AIDS, the virus can still lie dormant in the brain, increasing the risk for brain disease such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.
Naloxone is often used to revive people overdosing from opioids. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Why genetics makes some people more vulnerable to opioid addiction – and protects others

Scientists are just starting to understand how your parents' genes and experiences might shape your own susceptibility to dangerous drugs. Could that help to stop addictions before they start?

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