Artikel-artikel mengenai Latin America

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Nicaragua, which overthrew its last violent dictator in 1979, is the only Latin American country since Cuba to stage a successful revolution. AP Photo/Alfredo Zuniga

Nicaraguans try to topple a dictator — again

History shows that Latin American presidents usually don't last long after they use violence to repress mass protests. Is Nicaragua's Daniel Ortega the next to fall?
Mexico has been doing the U.S.‘s 'dirty work’ on immigration for too long, says the front-runner in the country’s July 1 presidential election. AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo

Mexico seeks to become ‘country of refuge’ as US cracks down on migrants

Trump's anti-immigrant policies are leading more Central Americans to stay put in Mexico. Mexico's presidential candidates have a lot to say about that, and none of it involves mass deportations.
Unpopular authoritarian leaders like Nicolás Maduro depend on military backing to stay in power. Miraflores Palace/Handout via REUTERS

Is Venezuela’s president afraid of a coup d'etat?

Venezuela has freed 79 political prisoners in recent months, to global plaudits. But the hard-line regime has also charged 100 military officials with conspiracy. Does President Maduro fear overthrow?
Colombia ended its 52-year conflict with the FARC guerrillas in late 2016. The next president must decide whether to uphold the deal. AP Photo/Ivan Valencia

Colombia’s presidential runoff will be a yet another referendum on peace

Two candidates from Colombia's May 27 presidential vote will face off on June 17. One is a former guerrilla. The other is a hard-liner. Their views for the nation's future couldn't be more different.
Many authors born in Latin America have produced some of their finest work while living in the United States. Alvy Libros/flickr

5 Latino authors you should be reading now

Spanish-speaking writers have made exceptional contributions to American literature. Here are the best Latin American and Latino authors you probably haven't heard of.
Fewer than 20 countries worldwide have recognized the re-election of Nicolás Maduro as Venezuela’s president. Reuters/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Venezuela is now a dictatorship

Maduro's landslide May 20 re-election marks the official death of democracy in Venezuela. Dozens of nations worldwide have declared the vote illegitimate, and the US imposed new sanctions.
Despite his 20 percent approval rate, President Nicolas Maduro is almost assured a win in Venezuela’s May 20 election. The opposition says the vote is a “farce.” REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Venezuelans are boycotting their presidential election

The Venezuelan opposition is asking people not to vote in the country's May 20 election, which they call a 'farce.' President Maduro regime has jailed or blacklisted most of his competitors.
Mario Abdo Benítez, or ‘Marito,’ as he’s known, is the son of the private secretary to Paraguayan dictator Alfredo Stroessner. Reuters/Andres Stapff

Paraguay’s new president recalls an old dictatorship

Paraguay's conservative president-elect Mario Abdo narrowly won the April 22 election. His father was the private secretary for dictator Alfredo Stroessner, who brutally ruled Paraguay for 35 years.
Firefighters didn’t expect to find hundreds of homeless families squatting in a São Paulo building that caught fire. REUTERS/Leonardo Benassatto

Deadly highrise fire in Brazil spotlights city’s housing crisis and the squatter movement it spawned

Hundreds of squatters were living in a vacant police station in São Paulo when fire broke out on May 1, killing up to four people. The residents were part of Brazil's nationwide homeless movement.
Protests against social security reforms in Nicaragua quickly gained traction. Now, even the Catholic Church is suggesting ‘democratization’ may be on the horizon. Reuters/Oswaldo Rivas

Nicaragua protests threaten an authoritarian regime that looked like it might never fall

For 11 years, Daniel Ortega's regime has been unshakable. But Nicaragua's autocratic leader is vulnerable after weeks of deadly protest. Now, some citizens are calling for him to resign.
Venezuelans were once among the world’s happiest people. Then the country descended into economic chaos and humanitarian crisis. Jorge Silva/Ruters

Why Venezuelans are some of the unhappiest people in the world

Venezuela – once known for its friendly people, oil wealth and beauty queens – ranks 102nd of 156 countries surveyed in this year's World Happiness Report, which measures well-being worldwide.

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