Artikel-artikel mengenai Latin America

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Argentina’s pro-choice movement, which began in 2003, hopes that the Senate will vote in favor of legalizing abortion on Aug. 8, 2018.

Facing a groundswell of support for legal abortion, Argentina’s Catholic Church moderates its tone

Abortion support is high in Argentina, even among Catholics. That puts the church, which opposes an abortion bill up for vote on August 8, in the awkward position of fighting a law its members demand.
New suicide data indicates that years of record bloodshed in Mexico have traumatized residents in places where the violence is most concentrated. Reuters/Jorge Lopez

Rising suicides in Mexico expose the mental health toll of living with extreme, chronic violence

Ciudad Juárez, on the US-Mexico border, has suffered high levels of deadly violence for over a decade. New suicide data reveals the severe mental health impacts of living with chronic violence.
The wife of Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro reacts to an explosion during a public event, which the regime says was a drone attempting to assassinate the president (Aug. 4, 2018). Venezolana de Television via AP

Drone attack or no, Venezuela’s Maduro regime is probably here to stay

How long can a rogue regime survive assassination attempts, sanctions, bankruptcy, humanitarian crisis and mass unrest? When it comes to Venezuela, President Maduro may cling to power for some time.
Luvia Hernandez Gomez, right, receives a monthly stipend from the Mexican government to help take care of her niece, center, and daughter, left. N. Haenn

Mexican anti-poverty program targeting poor women may help men most, study finds

Mexico gives poor, jobless moms up to $147 a month to feed and educate their kids. But money with strings attached may actually overburden women while freeing up their husbands' time and money.
Militias guard a barricade after police and pro-government militias stormed a rebel-held neighborhood in Masaya, Nicaragua, on July 17, 2018. AP Photo/Cristibal Venegas

Bloody uprising in Nicaragua could trigger the next Central American refugee crisis

Nicaragua has exploded in violence since mass protests began against President Daniel Ortega in April, with hundreds dead and thousands wounded. Amid such chaos, criminal violence is likely to follow.
Daily life in some parts of Central America is so fearsome for parents and children that crossing Mexico and risking detention in the U.S. seems less fearsome. Reuters/Edgard Garrido

Central American kids come to the US fleeing record-high youth murder rates at home

Central American youth are 10 times more likely to be murdered than children in the US. Child homicides in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are rising even as other violence declines.
Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador will take office as Mexico’s president on Dec. 1, 2018. Reuters/Goran Tomasevic

Mexico elects a leftist president who welcomes migrants

Leftist Andrés Manuel López Obrador, a former Mexico City mayor and career outsider, won Mexico's July 1 presidential election in a landslide. The US-Mexico relationship is about to change.
Nicaragua, which overthrew its last violent dictator in 1979, is the only Latin American country since Cuba to stage a successful revolution. AP Photo/Alfredo Zuniga

Nicaraguans try to topple a dictator — again

History shows that Latin American presidents usually don't last long after they use violence to repress mass protests. Is Nicaragua's Daniel Ortega the next to fall?
Mexico has been doing the U.S.‘s 'dirty work’ on immigration for too long, says the front-runner in the country’s July 1 presidential election. AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo

Mexico seeks to become ‘country of refuge’ as US cracks down on migrants

Trump's anti-immigrant policies are leading more Central Americans to stay put in Mexico. Mexico's presidential candidates have a lot to say about that, and none of it involves mass deportations.
Unpopular authoritarian leaders like Nicolás Maduro depend on military backing to stay in power. Miraflores Palace/Handout via REUTERS

Is Venezuela’s president afraid of a coup d'etat?

Venezuela has freed 79 political prisoners in recent months, to global plaudits. But the hard-line regime has also charged 100 military officials with conspiracy. Does President Maduro fear overthrow?

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