Artikel-artikel mengenai STEM

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King of a technologically advanced country, Black Panther is a scientific genius. Marvel Studios

The hidden superpower of ‘Black Panther’: Scientist role models

Seeing black lead characters who are accomplished scientists could be just the thing to help inspire future generations to follow in their footsteps.
From biotech to climate change, advances in technology raise significant moral questions. To engage responsibly, our next generation of scientists need training in the arts and ethics. (Shutterstock)

STEAM not STEM: Why scientists need arts training

Universities must train scientists to engage with the ethics of emerging technologies, rather than functioning as cogs in the engine of economic development. Integrating the arts into STEM can help.
Christmas lists usually suggest the latest and greatest technology, but blocks are still the best toy you can buy your child. Shutterstock

Blocks are still the best present you can buy children for Christmas

Blocks probably won't top Christmas wish lists, but they have many benefits including developing fine motor skills, social, cognitive and language skills, and spatial reasoning and language.
Career changers are intrinsically motivated and tend to be more committed to teaching, having changed careers later in life. Shutterstock

Want to solve our STEM skills problem? Bring in the professionals

STEM professionals who change careers to become teachers are often intrinsically motivated, and can help engage kids in STEM subjects with their real-world experience.
Research shows that when parents engage in simple science projects with their kids at home, it boosts their learning in school. (Shutterstock)

Science in the home boosts children’s academic success

From collecting bugs to using math apps, there are many ways parents can engage in STEM activities with their kids to support their learning.
Navdeep Bains, Canada’s innovation, science and economic development minister, takes part in a technology event in Ottawa in May 2017. The Canadian government has started up a $1.26-billion fund to support innovation-related business investments. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Is there too much emphasis on STEM fields at universities?

If leaders of educational institutions are concerned about the employability of graduates, they should avoid over-investing in STEM subjects and stop snubbing liberal arts.
By the age of 16, most teenagers have already made up their mind about climate change. from www.shutterstock.com

Why we’re building a climate change game for 12-year-olds

Players in the climate science game 'CO2peration' become a particle of sunlight, and travel on a journey to find out why we have liquid water at Earth’s surface.
If the government expanded the new $73 million Student Work-Integrated Learning program to all students it could help tackle Canada’s most intractable social problems — such as homelessness, reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, affordable housing, social cohesion and intercultural understanding.

Government should expand student placements into social sector

A new government program will create 10,000 work placements for undergraduates in only business and STEM subjects. Why not fund students to innovate in the social sector too?
At McMaster University, 40 per cent of assistant professors in engineering are now women and the school is working hard to make the profession more equitable for women. (Shutterstock)

Why engineering schools globally need more creative women

Engineering has long been a male-dominated profession. Now engineering schools globally are making extraordinary efforts to attract the creative female talent they really need.

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